Fracking Futures

HeHe, Fracking Futures, FACT 2013, 3
HeHe, Fracking Futures, FACT 2013
HeHe, Fracking Futures, preparatory illustration
The HeHe Fracking Futures installation at FACT Liverpool, 2013.
HeHe, Fracking Futures, FACT, 2013 'Turning FACT Inside Out'
The HeHe Fracking Futures installation in action at FACT Liverpool, 2013.
The HeHe Fracking Futures installation in action at FACT Liverpool, 2013.

Fracking Futures - a spectacular artwork and mini-disaster by the Paris-based artist duo Hehe, (Helen Evans and Heiko Hansen)

In collaboration with Arts Catalyst, HeHe turned FACT Liverpool’s main gallery into an industrial landscape in a playful and provocative commentary on crises of global economy, threats of environmental catastrophe and struggles of public institutions in times of austerity.

The Prix Ars Electronica award-winners warn that drilling could result in unquantifiable subterranean noise as tectonic plates shift, minor ground tremors are a possibility, and diluted chemicals used during the fracking process will be sprayed into the air as they mischievously turned the gallery into a temporary, experimental drilling site for hydraulic fracturing on a micro scale.

HeHe use a language based on light, sound and image, their practice explores the relationship between the individual and their architectural, social and urban environment, often creating playful miniature representations of vehicles or intervening directly with light projections and large-scale visual interruptions. They make a provocative commentary on crises of global economy, threats of environmental catastrophes and struggles of public institutions in times of austerity.

They hope this multi-sensory installation will highlight the importance and current relevance of the debates surrounding the fracking process, which are not only significant environmentally, but also economically. The installation will refrain from making judgements for or against fracking, rather offering a platform on which discussion can begin.

Fracking Futures not only illustrates the potential dangers and disruptions of the process, but also considers fracking as an alternative source of energy and subsequent potential for commerce and growth. Whether this last point is genuine or tongue-in-cheek is for the visitor to decide….

Press coverage

The Guardian

New Internationalist

Nicola Triscott's blog

Partnership

Part of FACT’s 10th anniversary exhibition Turning FACT Inside Out programme, 2013.