Co-Hostings | Research Residency and Public Programme

Over the next two years, Arts Catalyst will embark on a series of collective inquiries, titled Emergent Ecologies, around the ecology of Sheffield and the wider South Yorkshire region together with communities of humans and non humans* to re-imagine how to live together. 

 
In February 2020, Bahbak Hashemi-Nezhad was invited to utilise Arts Catalyst's relocation from London to Sheffield as a point of intervention to test out new organisational frameworks and relationships with the wider ecologies of the city it inhabits. 
 
In dialogue with an evolving group of human and non-human collaborators in Sheffield, Bahbak Hashemi-Nezhad's designer-led inquiry will draw on fields such as aesthetics, anthropology and play, to engage publics within design processes that respond to local social and environmental challenges. Through a programme of experimental workshops and radio broadcasts, Co-Hostings seeks to open up conversations to devise and test out ideas, actions and spatial structures to facilitate mutual exchange in the region.
 
*Communities of non-humans include plants, animals, insects, organisms, chemicals, rivers, etc.
 
** We use the term publics to refer to the multitude of different people and communities that make up what we think of as 'the public' rather than a homogenous entity. 
 
 
 
Bahbak Hashemi-Nezhad's design studio produces work spanning scales and disciplines, from the public realm to games, spaces and objects. Drawing on such fields as aesthetics, anthropology and play, his work develops through real-life projects, methodologies and tools to include and critically engage participants within design processes. 
 
He has developed projects, exhibited and conducted workshops and masterclasses both in the UK and internationally, including with the Serpentine Galleries; Greater London Authority; Tokyo Metropolitan Government; Shanghai Biennale; Victoria and Albert Museum; and MACBA Barcelona amongst others.
 
He trained at the Royal College of Art where he currently leads a Masters platform focusing on experimental co-design. 
 
 
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Project

A Public Hearing – Cromer Street Lyric

As part of Everyday Urbanism: Architecture as Social Process postgraduate students from Goldsmiths Centre for Research Architecture, University of London have been in residence at Arts Catalyst’s Cromer Street Centre throughout May and June 2016. During this time, they have developed a project titled A Public Hearing in which they have used the form and function of the public hearing as an aid for investigating a number of contemporary experiences. This has produced a eight channel sound installation, and a range of events examining different aspects of speaking and listening.

For the final event of the project on Saturday 25 June the group have invited local choir groups, singers and musicians for a new lyric to be composed; distilled from conversations with local people and sounds heard in and around the environs of Cromer Street in King's Cross.

This final installation of A Public Hearing, organised by students from the Centre for Research Architecture, looks at oral histories and the means by which knowledge can be altered and passed along. The process for composition will be collaborative – dialogue, consensus and disruption will be made evident in the final choral arrangement. Simultaneous to the performance a live recording with feedback will play in an adjacent room suggesting the configuration of Arts Catalyst as a sensing organ attuned to and bearing witness to unfolding events.

Event schedule

Saturday 25 June, 12 noon – 7pm
12 noon – 6pm Exhibition and performance
5pm – 7pm Closing Drinks reception

This event is FREE no booking required


Support:

A Public Hearting is supported by the Wellcome Trust and Arts Council England. 

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Event

A Public Hearing – How to Speak

As part of Arts Catalyst's current programme A Public Hearing, MA students from the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths, host a workshop exploring different ways of speaking in public with vocal coach Christopher Holt and local Kings Cross barrister Ousman Noor
 

Drawing on procedural documents from public hearings* as a starting point, this workshop, organised by students from the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths, looks at the conditions and protocols under which public speaking is conducted. Beginning with a review of speaking in formalized settings – such as court, council chambers or in parliament – we will then look to different, informal, modes of speaking – such as gossiping, complaining, whispering – and invite participants to draw up an alternate set of instruction manuals that give priority to such forms of speech. The latter part of the workshop will review how formal instructions are registered and performed, revealing the impact this has on what gets said and who gets heard, and how architecture changes the register of sound, affecting the ways speech is delivered and supported.

*Public hearings originated from the process of the enclosure of public lands in Britain in the 18th and 19th centuries. They were held in order to create a petition to parliament to enclose the land, and then later to hear objections to the act created by Parliament. Today, public hearings are still used when dealing with both public lands and private properties.

This workshop is aimed at residents and workers of the Kings Cross Area. Open to all ages but 16+ preferred unless accompanied by an adult.

Event Schedule


1pm Lunch (Free)
2pm Workshop (Free)
Vocal exercises, discussion and rewriting manuals plus an introduction on court procedures. 

Biographies

Christopher Holt is an actor, a theatre director, a lecturer, a voice coach and a disability arts practitioner, and he has a 20 years experience in teaching, training and developing singing and speaking voices. Holt has lead vocal workshops and taught voice for professional actors, singers and dancers, students of theatre and groups of senior citizens.

Ousman Noor is a Barrister with extensive experience in representing individuals in immigration detention, making bail applications in Immigration Tribunals on their behalf. This experience led to a strong conviction that immigration detention was often performed unlawfully with insufficient transparency or accountability to the rule of law. In 2014 he set up The Habeas Corpus Project, a non-profit organisation that provides pro-bono legal representation in challenging unlawful detention of individuals in the UK.

Arts Catalyst's Centre will be open to the public for A Public Hearing as part of Everyday Urbanism: Architecture as Social Process
Thursday 2 June – Friday 24 June 2016
Thursdays & Fridays, 12noon – 6pm

 

 

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Event

A Public Hearing – Technologies of Belonging

Calling all residents, workers and communities of Cromer Street and Kings Cross, come and share your stories at the first event in the A Public Hearing series

Saturday 28 May is the first in a series of events to explore the technologies of hearing and the point of mediation between the hearing and listening. It will be used as a foundation to lead into the events on the Saturday 11 June and Saturday 25 June that will continue to develop and explore these concepts and materials in more depth and alternative ones.

Technologies of Belonging investigates how hearing and vocalising are rehearsed. Presenting hearing as narration and storytelling rather than confession. Non-oral bodily sensing and an exploration of the non-human on variety of scales presented in an evolving exhibition as multi-speaker installation, with a collaged sequence of the recent interviews collected by the group with live elements fluctuating between different temporalities, histories and sounds.

Personal hearings

Through a series of informal conversations and discussions the group are inviting you between 1pm–3pm to come and contribute to a developing archive of material.

This event forms part of the first phase of Everyday Urbanism: Architecture as Social Process, where postgraduate students from the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths, University of London will be in residence at Arts Catalyst’s Cromer Street Centre throughout May and June. During this time, they will use the form and function of the public hearing as an aid for investigating a number of contemporary conditions.

Public hearings originated from the process of the enclosure of public lands in Britain in the 18th and 19th centuries. They were held in order to create a petition to parliament to enclose the land, and then later to hear objections to the act created by Parliament. Today, public hearings are still used when dealing with both public lands and private properties. Adopting the device of the public hearing, the Goldsmiths group will consider how diverse experiences and events are communicated through speech, vocalising, hearing and listening. Whose stories are heard and whose not? What other forms of nonhuman expression - animals, plants, industrial, atmospheric - are heard, and what new modes of sensing are needed? In short, who speaks and who listens, and with what technologies?

Arts Catalyst's Centre will be open to the public for A Public Hearing as part of Everyday Urbanism: Architecture as Social Process
Thursday 2 June – Friday 24 June 2016
Thursdays & Fridays, 12noon – 6pm
With events on Saturday 11 June and Saturday 25 June 2016
 
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Event

A Public Hearing

Arts Catalyst announces Everyday Urbanism: Architecture as Social Process, a research and public programme launching in May 2016 with A Public Hearing.

As the first phase of Everyday Urbanism: Architecture as Social Process, postgraduate students from the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths, University of London will be in residence at Arts Catalyst’s Cromer Street Centre throughout May and June. During this time, they will use the form and function of the public hearing as an aid for investigating a number of contemporary conditions.

Public hearings originated from the process of the enclosure of public lands in Britain in the 18th and 19th centuries. They were held in order to create a petition to parliament to enclose the land, and then later to hear objections to the act created by Parliament. Today, public hearings are still used when dealing with both public lands and private properties. Adopting the device of the public hearing, the Goldsmiths group will consider how diverse experiences and events are communicated through speech, vocalising, hearing and listening. Whose stories are heard and whose not? What other forms of nonhuman expression - animals, plants, industrial, atmospheric - are heard, and what new modes of sensing are needed? In short, who speaks and who listens, and with what technologies?

Through a series of hearings in June (some public, others with invited groups) and an exhibition, the students will bring together diverse participants, ideas and concerns. They will explore how the conditions of the hearing – vocalisation strategies, performance, technologies, architecture - affect how information travels from one body to an other and from one entity to many. Hearings will address local social issues, as well as more abstract themes.

Starting from Arts Catalyst’s new neighbourhood of Cromer Street in London’s Kings Cross and expanding out across the city, Everyday Urbanism: Architecture as Social Process will create a platform for international artists, urbanist collectives and research architects to link with a diverse range of local communities. Together these groups will explore and document the social, political and environmental issues affecting those who inhabit the city. Everyday Urbanism will evolve over the course of three years creating new relationships, networks, events, exhibitions and commissions.

Everyday Urbanism will be developed in collaboration with a curatorial advisory group including Arts Catalyst, Territorial Agency / John Palmesino and Ann-Sofi Rönnskog, curator Claire Louise Staunton (Flat Time House/MK Gallery) and Susan Schuppli, Deputy Director of the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths, University of London, and Cromer Street based Barrister Ousman Noor.

Hearings

A Public hearing – Technologies of Belonging
1.00pm - 3.00pm, Sat 28 May 2016
Arts Catalyst Centre for Art, Science & Technology, 74-76 Cromer Street, London WC1H 8DR
Calling all residents, workers and communities of Cromer Street and Kings Cross, come and share your stories at the first event in the A Public Hearing series
Saturday 28 May is the first in a series of events to explore the technologies of hearing and the point of mediation between the hearing and listening. It will be used as a foundation to lead into the events on the Saturday 11 June and Saturday 25 June that will continue to develop and explore these concepts and materials in more depth and alternative ones.
Technologies of Belonging investigates how hearing and vocalising are rehearsed. Presenting hearing as narration and storytelling rather than confession. Non-oral bodily sensing and an exploration of the non-human on variety of scales presented in an evolving exhibition as multi-speaker installation, with a collaged sequence of the recent interviews collected by the group with live elements fluctuating between different temporalities, histories and sounds.
 
A Public Hearing – How To Speak
Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths with Ousman Noor
12.30pm, Sat 11 June 2016
Arts Catalyst, Centre for Art, Science & Technology, 74-76 Cromer Street, London WC1H 8DR
As part of Arts Catalyst's current programme A Public Hearing, MA students from the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths, host a workshop exploring different ways of speaking in public with vocal coach Christopher Holt and local Kings Cross barrister Ousman Noor. 
Drawing on procedural documents from public hearings* as a starting point, this workshop, organised by students from the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths, looks at the conditions and protocols under which public speaking is conducted. Beginning with a review of speaking in formalized settings – such as court, council chambers or in parliament – we will then look to different, informal, modes of speaking – such as gossiping, complaining, whispering – and invite participants to draw up an alternate set of instruction manuals that give priority to such forms of speech. The latter part of the workshop will review how formal instructions are registered and performed, revealing the impact this has on what gets said and who gets heard, and how architecture changes the register of sound, affecting the ways speech is delivered and supported.
This workshop is aimed at residents and workers of the Kings Cross Area. Open to all ages but 16+ preferred unless accompanied by an adult.
 
EVENT SCHEDULE
1pm Lunch (Free)
2pm Workshop (Free)
Vocal exercises, discussion and rewriting manuals plus an introduction on court procedures. 
Christopher Holt is an actor, a theatre director, a lecturer, a voice coach and a disability arts practitioner, and he has a 20 years experience in teaching, training and developing singing and speaking voices. Holt has lead vocal workshops and taught voice for professional actors, singers and dancers, students of theatre and groups of senior citizens.
Ousman Noor is a Barrister with extensive experience in representing individuals in immigration detention, making bail applications in Immigration Tribunals on their behalf. This experience led to a strong conviction that immigration detention was often performed unlawfully with insufficient transparency or accountability to the rule of law. In 2014 he set up The Habeas Corpus Project, a non-profit organisation that provides pro-bono legal representation in challenging unlawful detention of individuals in the UK.
 
A Public Hearing – Cromer Street Lyric
Arts Catalyst Centre for Art, Science & Technology, 74-76 Cromer Street, London WC1H 8DR
Sat 25 June 2016
For the final event of the project the group have invited local choir groups, singers and musicians for a new lyric to be composed; distilled from conversations with local people and sounds heard in and around the environs of Cromer Street in King's Cross.
This final installation of A Public Hearing, organised by students from the Centre for Research Architecture, looks at oral histories and the means by which knowledge can be altered and passed along. The process for composition will be collaborative – dialogue, consensus and disruption will be made evident in the final choral arrangement. Simultaneous to the performance a live recording with feedback will play in an adjacent room suggesting the configuration of Arts Catalyst as a sensing organ attuned to and bearing witness to unfolding events.
Event schedule:
12 noon – 6pm Exhibition and Performance
5pm – 7pm Closing Drinks Reception
 

The Centre for Research Architecture is a pedagogical experiment and political project that sits at the intersection of many fields and disciplines from architecture and media to law and climate science. Practitioners from a wide-range of backgrounds work within new conceptual frameworks, developing cutting-edge tools for undertaking spatial research and critical analysis.

The Centre investigates the urgent political conditions of our time through practice-led research. It asks: How can architecture engage with questions of contemporary culture, politics, media, ecology, and justice? Through a combination of fieldwork, theoretical enquiry, and creative approach, spatial investigations include both practical and theoretical considerations, concentrating on a distinct issue, process or site.

 

The group:

Henry Bradley is an artist whose work currently centres around concepts of the rehearsal and the gesture, using performance to enact methods of estrangement, repetition and interruption to enquire into the nature of the event itself.

Dana Abbas is an architect and academic based in Jerusalem whose practice is engaged with spaces of informality, specifically in the Palestinian-Israeli geopolitical context. Her recent research investigates spaces of exclusion and the visualisation of forced disappearances.

Sophie Dyer is a designer based between London and Berlin who studied at The Glasgow School of Art. Recent group exhibitions include; Valise, Volksbühne, Berlin; The Persistence of Type, Tramway, Glasgow and The Miraculous, Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop. She also contributes to the Parallel School community and Concrete Flux magazine.

Phoebe Eustace studied Fine Art in Leeds and Lisbon. Researching modes of 'community planning' looking specifically at forms of dialogue when the conversation centers upon the infrastructure that is necessary and at the same time relates us to each other.

Alexia Giacomazzi attended the University of Sydney, Australia. While working at Project Native Informant, her own practice revolves around questions of sonic culture and environmental attunement.

Ming Lin is a writer-researcher whose activities have frequently revolved around a small distribution point, shop and exhibition space in Hong Kong. Her work examines the poetics of production and circulation, particularly the slippages that occur as synthetising new forms of agency.

Emma McCormick-Goodhart is an artist, writer and researcher whose work engages with the notion of the voice and its enunciation. Currently conceiving a radio series for Clocktower Productions, she is a co-author of concept and participant in Infinite Ear for the 2016 Bergen Assembly.

Robert Preusse studied Visual Communications at the Berlin University of the Arts and is a contributer to the Parallel School community. His current research is focused on opacities in metadata.

Blanca Pujals studied architecture at ETSAB, Barcelona, and received an MA in Critical Theory and Museum Studies at the Independent Studies Program, Macba Museum, Barcelona. Her practice merges architecture, writing, curatorial and artistic approaches through the material conditions of regimes of representation.

Laurie Robins is based in London. Currently he’s making films approximately focused on behavioral studies, scientific management, landscape and animation.

Solveig Suess is a designer working between Beijing and London. She is co-founder of Concrete Flux, a journal addressing spatial conditions in China, and is currently enquiring into aliens, alibis and the New Silk Road.

Alexandra Symons Sutcliffe is a researcher, writer and organiser based in London. Her work is currently focused on issues of uncreative production, maintenance and fidelity.

Leonie Weber studied architecture in Stuttgart, Darmstadt and Århus. She is part of different research collectives and networks, such as baladilab, Architects for Social Housing and Concrete Action. Based in London, her current research focuses on ethical notions in the field of spatial practice, housing policies and the scope of ownership.

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Exhibition

Arctic Architecture: API Cahier No.1, 2010

The first publication in the Arctic Perspective Initiative series

This publication documents the Arctic Perspective Initiative (API)'s open architecture competition to design a mobile media-based work and habitation unit, capable of functioning in extreme cold, and explores the Arctic and its architecture.

Essays by Robert Kronenburg, Marilyn Walker, Carsten Krohn and Jeremie Michael McGowan, with contributions by John Ross and Stijn Verhoeff, Matthew Biederman and Marko Peljhan.
 

Publication details

Arctic Architecture: API Cahier No.1
ISBN 978-3-7757-2679-5
Edited by Andreas Müller
Published by Hatje Cantz and API partners: HMKV, Projekt Atol, C-TASC, Lorna, and Arts Catalyst, 2010
Colour and monochrome, 148 pages, hardcover, English
Dimensions 165 x 240mm
€19.80/£16.50

Buy online from Hatje Cantz

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Media or publication

Ice Lab: New Architecture and Science in Antarctica

Ice Lab presents some of the most innovative and progressive examples of contemporary architecture in Antarctica. 

The first exhibition of its kind, it will draw together projects that not only utilise cutting-edge technology and engineering, but have equally considered aesthetics, sustainability and human needs in their ground-breaking designs for research stations.

Initiated by the British Council and curated by Arts Catalyst, Ice Lab features four international projects: Halley VI, UK (Hugh Brougton Architects) Princess Elizabeth, Belgium (International Polar Foundation), Bharati, India (bof architekten/IMS), Jang Bogo, South Korea (Space Group), and the Iceberg Living Station (MAP Architects) – a speculative design for a future research station to be entirely made from compacted snow.

The visually rich exhibition also highlights the diverse science that takes place on the frozen continent – from collecting 4.5 billion year old meteorites that illuminate how the solar system was formed to drilling ice cores whose bubbles of ancient air reveal the earth’s climate history; from cutting edge astronomy peering into the world’s clearest skies to studying its Dry Valleys, the closest thing to ‘Mars on Earth’.

Torsten Lauschmann has made two a new audio and light works, 'Whistler' and 'Ice Diamond', in response to a commission from Arts Catalyst especially for the exhibition.  The Glasgow-based artist will create this work in collaboration with ‘We Made That’, the exhibition’s designers.

Drawing on a number of archives and collections Ice Lab will include original drawings, models, photographs, films, ephemera and sources of inspiration for these highly specialised, sci-fi looking infrastructures – the closest thing to future space stations on the Moon and on Mars.

The featured projects are:

British Antarctic Survey’s Halley VI The first fully relocatable polar research station in the world became fully operational in February 2013 and signals a new dawn for 21st Century polar research. Opening 100 years after Captain Scott’s famed Antarctic expeditions, this new state of the art facility, designed by Hugh Broughton Architects and engineered by AECOM (UK) fulfils the UK’s ambition to remain at the forefront of scientific endeavour. Located 10,000 miles from the UK on a floating ice shelf, the new station is designed to be self-sufficient, able to withstand freezing winter temperatures of minus 55ºC, have minimal impact on Antarctica’s pristine environment, and be an aesthetically stimulating place to live and work.

Princess Elisabeth Antarctica
Conceived, designed, constructed and operated by the International Polar Foundation (Belgium), Princess Elisabeth is Antarctica's first zero-emission station. Perched on a nunatuk, 200km from the coast, at an altitude of 1400m, the aerodynamic stainless steel structure can withstand strong Antarctic wind, and is layered so that no form of interior heating is needed. The station seamlessly integrates renewable wind and solar energy, water treatment facilities, passive building technologies and a smart grid for maximising energy efficiency.

Bharati Research Station
India’s third Antarctic research station by bof Architekten / IMS (Germany) is a striking modernist structure made from 134 prefabricated shipping containers. Wrapped in a special aluminium case its extensive glazing offers magnificent panoramic views whilst withstanding powerful winds, below 40 degree Celsius temperatures, blizzards and unfathomable loads.

Jang Bogo
Korea is becoming a significant player in Antarctic research and Jang Bogo, by Space Group (South Korea), will be one of the largest year-round bases on the continent when it opens in 2014. The station’s aerodynamic triple-arm design will provide resistance to the elements and accommodate up to 60 personnel during the busy summer season.

Iceberg Living Station
A speculative design by David Garcia / MAP Architects (Denmark) for a future research station made entirely from ice, Iceberg Living Station negates the need to transport foreign materials to Antarctica. The station will be holed out of a large iceberg, using caterpillar excavators that are traditionally used to clear snow. It will eventually melt, resolving the issue of removing it at the end of its life course.

Publication

Accompanying the exhibition there is a publication with essays written by Dr David Walton (British Antarctic Survey and author of the recent ‘Antarctica: Global Science from a Frozen Continent’) and Sam Jacob (co-founder of FAT architects, lecturer and writer).  This is available in electronic book and print format. 

Partners and links

Commissioned and organised by the British Council and curated by The Arts Catalyst

The Lighthouse

A+DS - Architecture and Design Scotland

MOSI - Museum of Science and Industry

Torsten Lauschmann

We Made That

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Arctic Perspective Initiative

Arctic Perspective highlighted the cultural, geopolitical and ecological significance of the Arctic and its indigenous cultures. In collaboration with the people of Igloolik and other communities in Nunavut, Canada, artists and architects are devising a mobile media and living unit and infrastructure, powered by renewable energy sources, which can be used for nomadic dwelling environmental monitoring and media based work 'on the land', away from the established Arctic settlements.

API was initiated artists Marko Peljhan and Matthew Biederman.

The API project website gives details of the process of the project, including the team's visits to Igloolik, Foxe Basin and other Inuit communities in Nunavut, Arctic Canada, the international open architecture competition to design the media unit, and the construction of the prototype unit.

Publications


Cahier No. 1: Arctic Architecture (ISBN 978-3-7757-2679-5) is now available - order online here
Cahier No. 2: Arctic Geopolitics & Autonomy (ISBN 978-3-7757-2681-8) - order online here
 

Exhibitions

Arctic Perspective, London
21 May - 30 September 2010
Canada House, Trafalgar Square, London, UK
The Arctic Perspective exhibition at Canada House showed film and photographic documentation of the API project, including specially commissioned architectural models of the winning entries from an international open design competition for the mobile unit, which received more than 100 entries from over 30 countries. The winning unit architectural designs are by Richard Carbonnier (Canada), Catherine Rannou (France) and Giuseppe Mecca (Italy). Presented in conjunction with the London Festival of Architecture.

Arctic Perspective, Dortmund
18 June - 10 October 2010
HMKV Phoenix Halle, Dortmund, Germany

The Arctic Perspective Open Space conference, Dortmund, Germany gathered some of the most dynamic thinkers from and on the circumpolar regions and the open source technology and tactical media communities in an intense three-day situation involving critical debate and reflection.
Collectively, the conference served as working meeting to envision future strategies of circumpolar interconnectedness, exchange, strategies and tactics of autonomy, the landscape of current circumpolar geopolitics, mobility, open-source information sharing, citizen sensing strategies, ecology, culture and the arts.
 
Active members of indigenous circumpolar communities, thinkers, writers, architects, artists, and technologists took part in the open space. They were working towards making an inclusive statement regarding an autonomous, indigenous driven future of the global North as it relates to access to new technologies and infrastructures and a future, technologically mediated, ecologically sound mobility.
 
The open space conference was held in conjunction with the Arctic Perspective exhibition at the PHOENIX Halle Dortmund (18 June – 10 October 2010) in the context of the European Capital of Culture RUHR 2010.
 
The 3-day gathering of some of the most dynamic thinkers from and on the circumpolar regions and the open source technology and tactical media communities included some events open to the public.
 
Friday, 24 September 2010
PHOENIX Halle, Dortmund, Germany
 
19:30 David Turnbull, Victorian Eco-Innovation Lab (VEIL), Architecture Faculty, Melbourne University (AU): Performativity: A Key to Autonomy, Mobility, and Working with Multiple Knowledges and Technologies in Distributed Systems (keynote)
 
Saturday, 25 September 2010
PHOENIX Halle, Dortmund, Germany
 
The Canadian Arctic Perspective: Inuit Culture, Technology, Autonomy
 
Michael Bravo, Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge (CA/UK): An Arctic Geopolitics without the Inside Out: Experiments in Autonomy (keynote)
 
Film screening: Inuuvunga – I Am Inuk, I Am Alive, CA 2004, 57 min 40 s
 

Contemporary Nomadism: Autonomy & Technology in the North (Discussion event)
20 May 2010, Canada House, London
Artists, academics and architects explored the API's cultural, historical and political contexts. Panel: Marko Peljhan, artist and instigator of Arctic Perspective Initiative, director Projekt Atol (Slovenia), David Turnbull, science sociologist (Australia), Richard Carbonnier, architect (Canada), Inke Arns, curator, artistic director HMKV (Germany). Chair: Michael Bravo, Scott Polar Research Institute (UK/Canada)

Arctic Perspective Open Space Conference
24-26 September 2010, PHOENIX Halle, Dortmund, Germany
The API open space conference gathered some of the most dynamic thinkers from and on the circumpolar regions and the open source technology and tactical media communities in an intense three-day situation involving critical debate and reflection.

Support

API is supported by the European Commission Culture 2007 Programme, City of Dortmund, Federal Centre for Civic Education, Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Slovenia, City of Ljubljana and Arts Council England.

Partners include the Arctic Perspective Initiative, HMKV in Germany, Projekt Atol in Slovenia, C-TASC in Canada, Lorna in Iceland and Arts Catalyst in the UK.

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Makrolab Scotland

Makrolab is a high-tech, art-science project. A temporary sustainable laboratory designed to support 4 – 6 artists and scientists working and living alongside each other in isolation for periods of up to 120 days.

Within the Makrolab, researchers study telecommunications, environment, migration and weather patterns. Makrolab's creator, Slovenian artist Marko Peljhan sees these multiple-dynamic global systems as the source of understanding how our planet functions on social, technological and natural levels.

Makrolab in Scotland took place during the International Year of Mountains, declared by the UN General Assembly. Makrolab is sited on the Clunes Beat, Atholl Estate, Perthshire from late May to the end of July 2002.

Over three months during summer 2002 a crew of artists, scientists and media activists inhabited the Makrolab in the Scottish highlands.

crew 1:

  • Fraser MacDonald
  • Abigail Reynolds
  • Matthew Biedermann
  • Anna Jakomulska

June 5 - June 18

crew 2:

  • Tomasz Szymura
  • Ewen Chardronet
  • Ilana Halperin

June 18 - July 1

crew 3:

  • Lisa Parks
  • Ursula Biemann
  • Katrin Lund
  • Miles Chalcraft
  • Ewen Chardronet

June 29 - July 7

crew 4:

  • Katrin Lund
  • Miles Chalcraft
  • Calum Stirling
  • Helena Johard
  • Dan Belasco Rogers

July 7 - July 14

crew 5:

  • Helena Johard

  • Stephen Kovats
  • Helen Evans
  • Calum Stirling

July 15 - July 29

crew 6:

  • Tim Knowles
  • Stephen Kovats
  • Helen Evans
  • Adam Hyde
  • Honor Harger
  • Ewen Chardronet
  • Nina Czegledy

Partners & Funders

  • Organised by The Arts Catalyst and Projekt Atol with the Tramway, Glasgow, in partnership with:
  • Atholl Estates
  • Centre for Mountain Studies at Perth College (an Academic Partner of the UHI Millennium Institute)
  • Supported by the Arts Council of England, Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Slovenia, Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Henry Moore Foundation, SciArt Awards, Mobitel and BT Open World and Mobitel d.d. In association with Tramway.

 

MAKROLAB VENICE

Marko Peljhan
Sun 1 June 2003 - Wed 31 December 2003
ZENOMAP, Rio Tinto Foscarini, Dorsoduro, Venice
Makrolab, Isola di Campalto, Venice, Italy
The Arts Catalyst organised the launch event for Makrolab in Venice and the Arts Catalyst/Projekt Atol/Tramway Makrolab publication marking 5 years of Projekt Atol’s Makrolab first phase, culminating in Makrolab in Scotland 2002. The second 5 years starts with Makrolab in Venice 2003.
Projekt Atol organised the siting of Makrolab on the Isola di Campalto in the Venice lagoon as part of the 2003 Venice Biennale.
 
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East of Eden

East of Eden was an ambitious collaborative project between artist Lucy Stockton-Smith and The Arts Catalyst with Sandwich Technology School in Kent. The project began in October 2004 and was handed over to the school in July 2006.


For 18 months, Lucy Stockton-Smith worked with teachers and students to plan, design, build and fully utilise two geodesic ecology domes in the grounds of the school. Each dome now houses a microenvironment in which food crops are grown. The ‘Perma-pod’ is an environment which follows the principles of sustainable land use. It incorporates a wormery and is used to cultivate plants and wildlife which are ‘companions’, and beneficial to each other and the soil. The ‘Techno-pod’ aims to recreate contemporary farming methods, including the use of pesticides and intensive cultivation.

These contrasting environments have served as a platform from which artists have led a diverse range of workshops across the school curriculum, in science, art, design and technology, geography, music and history. The project has seized upon areas where science has overlapped into other subjects.

Students have been growing a huge variety of fruit and vegetables both inside and outside the domes. They conduct wildlife surveys, document the plant life and use it for inspiration for poetry and writing. Others are currently researching and designing a medieval garden.

Other artists have come in to work on the project and lead workshops, including Antony Hall and Marcus Ahlers. Artists’ workshops have included making solar ovens and solar puddles; a bio-acoustic project; and the building of a rain water harvesting system and an automatic irrigation system for the domes.

 

Partnership

The project was developed with Creative Partnerships Kent and is supported by Pfizer and Wight Salads.

 

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