Research is Not Terrorism: Steve Kurtz

Steve Kurtz, artist, activist and researcher, arrested by the FBI

Steve Kurtz of Critical Art Ensemble spoke about his case for the first time since his arrest in the USA. He was accompanied by Claire Pentecost from the Critical Art Ensemble Defense Fund.

Steve Kurtz was wrongly arrested in 2004, the FBI on charges relating to bioterrorism, because he had sourced some harmless bacteria to use in an artistic project. The bioterrorism charges were finally dropped by a Grand Jury, after an international storm of protest, however Steve still faces FBI charges of mail fraud (a charge traditionally used by the FBI when they can't pin another charge on someone - Critical Art Ensemble are known for their political views expressed through their work). Also indicted was Robert Ferrell, head of the Department of Genetics at the University of Pittsburgh's School of Public Health. The charges concern technicalities of how Ferrell helped Kurtz to obtain $256 worth of harmless bacteria for one of Kurtz's art projects.

Artists, scientists and civil liberties groups internationally have publicly condemned both the old and new charges and the continued harrassment of Steve Kurtz and many people that he has worked with. These new charges still carried a potential jail sentence of 20 years and threaten many researchers in the sciences who source material in a similar way.

Critical Art Ensemble (CAE) is a collective of five tactical media practitioners of various specialisations including computer graphics and web design, film/video, photography, text art, book art and performance. Formed in 1987, CAE's focus has been on the exploration of the intersections between art, critical theory, technology and political activism. The group has exhibited and performed at diverse venues internationally, ranging from the street, to the museum, to the internet. Museum exhibitions include the Whitney Museum and the New Museum in NYC, Corcoran Museum in Washington D.C., ICA in London, MCA in Chicago, Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt and the Natural History Museum in London.
The collective has written seven books, with writings translated into 18 languages. Titles include The Electronic Disturbance (1994), Electronic Civil Disobedience & Other Unpopular Ideas (1996), Flesh Machine: Cyborgs, Designer Babies, & New Eugenic Consciousness (1998), Digital Resistance: Explorations in Tactical Media (2001), Molecular Invasion (2002), Marching Plague (2006) and Disturbances (2012).
Their participatory theatre aims to involve the public in the processes of biotechnology in order to contribute to the development of an informed and critical public discourse on contemporary bioscience.
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Event

Srishti Science-Art / Space-Art Workshop

A 5-day series of workshops on themes of science and art, and space and the arts, led by London Fieldworks and The Arts Catalyst

With Bruce Gilchrist & Jo Joelson (London Fieldworks), Nicola Triscott and Rob La Frenais (The Arts Catalyst), Geetha Narayanan (Srishti), Sarah Neville, Mukund Thattai, N S Harsha, A V Varghese and Vivek Vilasini.

19 Jan - Science & art workshop
20 Jan - Space & the arts workshop
21 & 23 Jan - 'Spacebaby' workshop for Srishti students led by London Fieldworks
23 Jan - Ham radio workshop

A collaboration between Srishti School of Art, Design and Technology and The Arts Catalyst

Participants

Nicola Triscott is a cultural producer, curator and writer, specialising in the intersections between art, science, technology and society. She was the founding Artistic Director/CEO of Arts Catalyst, one of the UK’s most distinctive arts organisations, distinguished by ambitious artists’ commissions that engage with science, including notable projects by Tomas Saraceno, Ashok Sukumaran, Aleksandra Mir, Otolith Group and Critical Art Ensemble, and the international dimension of its programme of exhibitions, events, research and publications. Nicola has curated numerous exhibitions and events for Arts Catalyst. She lectures and publishes internationally, including books on art and technology in the Arctic, art and space, and ecological art. She blogs at nicolatriscott.org on the critical inter-relationships between the arts, humanities and our technoscientific society. Nicola left Arts Catalyst in April 2019 to take on the role of CEO at FACT, Liverpool.

London Fieldworks aims to enable creative research and collaboration at the art, science and technology interesection. Typically, their projects deal with issues relating to complex relationships existing between social, natural and technological worlds. London Fieldworks was formed by the artists Bruce Gilchrist and Jo Joelson.

Rob La Frenais is an independent curator and critic who has curated and produced interdisciplinary and visual art projects since 1987 and with The Arts Catalyst since 1997. Before joining The Arts Catalyst, he was a freelance curator and organiser working in a European context in various countries, including being the Chief Executive of the Edge Biennale Trust in London and Madrid and the Artistic Director of the Belluard-Bollwerk International in Switzerland. In 1979 Rob founded the groundbreaking Performance Magazine, which continued as an authoritative cultural voice in Europe until 1992. He has a PhD in curatorial practice across disciplines and is an honorary Doctor of Arts at Dartington College of Arts.

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Experience

SPACE SOON: Art and Human Spaceflight

"We are all already in Space... "

Major new commissions by Aleksandra Mir, N55/Neal White, and London Fieldworks
Projects by Michelle Griffiths, Jerry Dammers, Kodwo Eshun, Resonance FM and Laurie Anderson and a special appearance by Apollo astronaut Alan Bean.

This was Buckminster Fuller's reported response to the first flight into space by Yuri Gagarin. Artists - caught between fascination and repulsion by the new millennial push to Mars and return to the Moon - are still trying to decode the manual to Spaceship Earth.

For a short, intense period the Roundhouse was transformed into a rocket factory for a rocket going nowhere - Gravity by Aleksandra Mir. Outside, N55 and Neal White’s Space on Earth Station reversed into the future, while in the labyrinth of Roundhouse Studios, London Fieldworks investigated long-term space travel in SpaceBaby, while on the upper floors Michelle Griffiths constructed her Lunar Capsule. In the lead up to, and over the five days of its duration, Space Soon unfolded a spectacular succession of art and space events.

Major new commissions:

Gravity - Aleksandra Mir

Sat 9 September 2006 - Wed 13 September 2006

The Camden Roundhouse, London

Gravity was a monumental, ephemeral scuplture, a 22-metre rocket of giant junk, reaching to the top of the Roundhouse main space, built and dismantled in just 5 days. It was constructed out of junk: steel, fibreglass, tractor tires, industrial fans and a discarded tank from a toothpaste factory.  It took two days of construction on site, stood erect for three days only and was dismantled in another two days.

The rocket that effectively went nowhere is commemorated through a mixture of production stills, drawings, space ephemera and the artist’s own pin up photos taken in scrap yards around England during the search for old and dirty things to make the work. 
SUPPORTED BY:
The Arts Council of England, The Henry Moore Foundation
Industrial Design & Fabrication - Cory Burr, C.Burr Design / Stratford Welding
Engineering - Price Myers
Rigging - MTec Freight Group
 

Space on Earth Station - N55 / Neal White

Sat 9 September 2006 - Tue 1 September 2009

The Camden Roundhouse, London

Radical Danish architects N55 and UK artist Neal White constructed and inhabited a Mars base-type series of microdwellings, taking over the entirety of the Roundhouse car park, in order to explore our terrestrial neighbourhood.

Space on Earth Station is a space station on earth. It is an experiment that is inhabitable, fully functional, using a low-tech and low-economy architecture. It is concerned with the transfer of knowledge and exploration of bottom-up aesthetics. Space on Earth Station is foremost an experiment that aims to explore conditions for living, and experiment with our removal from and reconnection with what is natural. Natural in terms of nature, rights, relationships and our social structures. It was designed, set up and inhabited by Danish radical architect group N55 with UK artist Neal White. During the week, experiments and expeditions were conducted in collaboration with artists and the public. Collaborators included artists Marcus Ahlers and Kayle Brandon.
 

SpaceBaby - London Fieldworks

Sat 9 September 2006 - Mon 4 June 2007
The Camden Roundhouse, London, in collaboration with the Department of Genetics, University of Leicester.
Whitechapel Art Gallery, London

A durational sleep experiment and installation by artists London Fieldworks, investating long-term sleep and hibernation, with the University of Leicester Department of Genetics.

SpaceBaby was a performance-installation and lab in action performed during Space Soon at the Roundhouse.
SpaceBaby - performance installation and lab in action. A new video work Spacebaby: Guinea Pigs Don't Dream incorporated images from the experiment.
SpaceBaby was the first in a trilogy of works by London Fieldworks exploring the theme of hibernation and suspended animation in the form of a performance installation and lab in action. The project referenced the vested interest of space agencies into the possibility of human hibernation and acknowledged fictional representations of human hibernation within science fiction writing and film. The artists inverted their sleeping patterns and slept within the installation during exhibition opening hours. In the context of SpaceBaby, a parallel was drawn between shiftworkers and astronauts on long haul space missions. The lab-in-action was manned by a team of geneticists who examinined the effects of disrupted sleep upon whole genome, gene expression, with a particular interest in individuals undertaking shiftwork. Blood samples were periodically extracted from the sleep inverted artists and processed within the installation using Affymetrix gene chip Technology. The processing of the samples resulted in a series of images depicting the gene expression of disrupted sleep and were incorporated into the video work, SPACEBABY: Guinea Pigs Don’t Dream.
 
SPACEBABY: GUINEA PIGS DON'T DREAM - VIDEO WORK
SpaceBaby is a 20-minute semi-fictional video journey into genetic space. It is the latest addition to London Fieldworks’ Hibernator, a trilogy of installation and video works connecting myth and science, environmental cues and technological control, the virtual worlds we imagine and the real world we cannot escape. It mixes laboratory procedure with physical performance, CGI, narrative and sound. Human guinea pigs, fruit flies and lab rats are seen inhabiting a hallucinatory 24-hour world where night and day are interchangeable.
Working with writer Ken Hollings and composer Dugal McKinnon, London Fieldworks artists Jo Joelson and Bruce Gilchrist have used documentary footage of the live SpaceBaby experiment, along with resulting data and footage shot around the capital. The narrative is played out in a world where everyone on earth appears to have fallen into a sleep-like trance. Has the whole planet stopped moving or merely its inhabitants?
The film was premiered at Whitechapel Art Gallery, 4 June 2008
 
FUNDERS & SPONSORS
The SpaceBaby experiment and installation at Space Soon was funded by Arts Council England and supported by AHRC, University of Leicester, Affymetrix and Ambion
The SpaceBaby video work was Funded by Arts & Business (New Partners Award), AHRC and Arts Council England and sponsored by Affymextrix, Ambion, with collaborative support from Department of Genetics at University of Leicester.
 

Lunar Capsule - Michelle Griffiths

Lunar Capsule was a whimsical Victorian butterfly-powered spaceship reminiscent of that in Jules Verne’s Earth to the Moon. The module was hinged with a clasp like a jewellery box and the instruments in the plush velour upholstered interior were unreliable. Mrs Bloom had a lot of time on her hands while she waited for touchdown on the moon.

Events:

Taking Control

Symposium exploring the future of space exploration from the human perspective.

Cosmic Engineers: Jerry Dammers Spatial AKA Orchestra - Tribute to Sun Ra + Special Screening of Out of the Present

Sat 9 September 2006

The Camden Roundhouse, London

The premiere of Jerry Dammers' new Spatial AKA Orchestra, presenting a tribute to the legendary jazz composer Sun Ra, and special screening of Andrei Ujica’s cult Russian space film Out of the Present.

Space Soon was proud to present the premiere gig of Jerry Dammers' new band, The Spatial AKA Orchestra.

Songwriter and keyboardist Jerry Dammers (founder of The Specials and the 2 Tone Record label) and his 18-piece orchestra paid tribute to the cosmic jazz of Sun Ra, the prolific space-jazz explorer who famously claimed to have gained his musical purpose on a trip to Saturn. Costumes, theatrics and visuals mixed with ska, reggae, hip-hop, dub-step, rock and outer-spatial sounds created an unforgettable ride across the galaxies.

Jeremy Dammers and Kodwo Eshun also made a special screening of' Andrei Ujica's cult Russian space movie Out of the Present.

 

Secret Artist on the Moon: Apollo astronaut Alan Bean

7.00pm, Sun 10 September 2006
The Camden Roundhouse, London

Legendary Apollo astronaut, Alan Bean, discussed his experience of being on the moon, the impact of spaceflight on the human mind, and the power of art.

Apollo astronaut Alan Bean, the 4th man on the moon, talks of space and art - A Secret Artist on the Moon
Legendary Apollo astronaut, Alan Bean, one of only nine men alive today who walked on the moon, visited London for the first time to discuss his experience of visiting the moon and the power of art with author Andrew Smith.
Alan Bean, moonwalker and artist, was captured perfectly in Andrew Smith's best-selling book Moondust evoking the rawness of that moment 37 years back when he grabbed hold of something solid and looked up: "This is the Moon, that's the Earth, I'm really here, I'm really here."
In Secret Artist on the Moon, Alan Bean - who now makes paintings that attempt to bring to life that elusive experience - brings a uniquely human insight to that rare moment, never repeated, when humans for a few years left the earth's orbit to voyage to our nearest neighbour. We have never returned.
A uniquely human perspective on voyaging further away from home than any other person has ever been. 
 

Brilliant Noise - Glorious Soviet Cosmos

Sat 9 September 2006
The Camden Roundhouse, London

Film night with Alexei Federchenko's First on the Moon, Jane & Louise Wilson's Dream Time, and Semiconductor's Brilliant Noise.

The astonishing Russian documentary First on the Moon by Alexei Fedorchenko shakes our understanding of the history of human spaceflight. 
Dream Time by Jane and Louise Wilson shows the lingering power of the Russian space programme in the cash-strapped post-Soviet era.
In Semiconductor’s Brilliant Noise, untouched images of our sun, captured by the SoHo satellite, present an alternative aesthetic of space.
 

Laurie Anderson in conversation

Tue 12 September 2006

The Camden Roundhouse, London

Laurie Anderson, NASA's former artist-in-residence returned to the UK, after the success of her show End of the Moon, to reflect on her NASA experience and her visit with The Arts Catalyst to Russia’s space programme with the writer and theorist Kodwo Eshun.

When NASA appointed the musician and artist, Laurie Anderson, as their first official artist-in-residence, they probably had in mind a celebratory and hi-tec output – perhaps lasers bouncing off the moon. But Anderson, disturbed by NASA’s revived plans to revisit and exploit the moon, created the performance piece The End of the Moon. NASA swiftly decided that there would be no further artists-in-residence.
In 2005, Anderson visited Russia’s space programme – the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Centre and mission control – with The Arts Catalyst and saw a very different side of the human spaceflight story, where the post-Soviet cash-strapped Russian space agency sells flights into space to Japanese dotcom billionaires at $20 million a time.
Anderson paid a special flying visit to London to take part in The Arts Catalyst's Space Soon event at the Roundhouse on Tuesday 12 September to reflect on her experiences, show her photographs and videos from her visit to Star City, in conversation with the author and critic Kodwo Eshun.

 

We're All Going to Die

Resonance FM's operatic, radiophonic concatenation of space ephemera and near-Earth collision paranoia. Featuring the divergent talents of Ken Hollings, DJ Original Bear, Tom McCarthy, Johny Trunk, DJ Rocket 88, Resonance Radio Orchestra and Lembit Opik MP.
Resonance FM
broadcasted live from the Roundhouse throughout Space Soon.

Near Earth: a week of space creation

Mon 21 August 2006 - Fri 25 August 2006
The Camden Roundhouse, London

In the lead up to Space Soon, The Arts Catalyst and Roundhouse Studios organised a week-long workshop for young people aged 14-19 years, taking them on a journey exploring space through digital photography, animation, sound and music, drama and the performing arts.

Workshops were led by Semiconductor, Luke Jerram, Kate Tierney, Tony Hall, Trevor Mathison, Mat Fox, Marcus Ahlers, Hilary Westlake and Morag Wightman, with the input of scientists Chris Welch, Kevin Fong and Mark Lythgoe.
SPACE ANIMATION
Led by Semiconductor - animation artists Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhadt - participants took snapshots produced from satelites orbiting the earth and explored how to create time-lapse digital animation sequences.
SPACE DIGITAL FILM & PHOTOGRAPHY
Led by arist Luke Jerram, participants explored the tricks of film and photography and learned how experts manipulate images from space. 
SPACE RADIO
Led by artists Kate Tierney and Antony Hall, participants worked to decode and transmit sound from space.
SPACE MUSIC 1 - RECORDED
Led by musician Trevor Mathison, participants experimented with panning, overlaps, fades, dissolves, delay and reverbs to record their journey to space.
SPACE MUSIC 2 - LIVE
Led by Mat Fox. Participants joined an out-of-this world band and created some cosmic sounds and recorded their own live sessions.
EXPLORING ENERGY
Led by Marcus Ahlers, participants collected electricity from sunlight, built hydrogen fuel cells and became energy technologists of the future.
SPACE DRAMA
Led by theatre maker ilary Westlake. Participants explored outer space themes using iconic music and images and created a striking theatrical performance.
SPACE MOVEMENT
Led by dancer Morag Wightman. Participants worked suspended off the floor and explored aerial dance with Morag Wightman, one of the very few dancers to experience zero gravity first hand, to create a new piece exploring gravity.
 

Artists

Aleksandra Mir studied a BFA in Media Arts at the School of Visual Arts in New York and Cultural Anthropology at The New School for Social Research in New York. Much of Aleksandra's work explores social norms and human interactions with space. As part of Arts Catalyst's SPACE SOON event in 2006, Aleksandra Mir created a rocket made out of junk entitled “Gravity”. The artist explored scrap yards and found steel, fibreglass, tractor tires, industrial fans and a discarded tank from a toothpaste factory to make her work in the former engine shed of The Roundhouse, London. When finished, the “rocket” scaled 20 metres high, took two days of construction on site and stood erect for only three days. The work is intended to highlight failures and resistance in the history of space exploration – a catalogue of various failures, disasters, minor mishaps and political hurdles. The construction and dismantling of 'Gravity' was published as a calendar Gravity: The Eternal Countdown.

For over 20 years, Neal White has critically explored art in relation to new ideas, forms and technologies. As part of numerous collaborative endeavours – he has been developing projects, research and artworks, publications, archives, fieldworks, critical excursions as bus tours and exhibitions with academics, architects and activists. His current work explores situated practices and knowledge - drawing together environmental and ecological matters of concern with marine biologists, ecologists, coders, architects and volunteers in Poole Harbour and Brownsea Island, Dorset for Arts Catalyst's Test Sites programme.

London Fieldworks was formed by the artists Bruce Gilchrist and Jo Joelson. London Fieldworks aims to enable creative research and collaboration at the art, science and technology interesection. Typically, their projects deal with issues relating to complex relationships existing between social, natural and technological worlds. In 2006, London Fieldworks collaborated with The Arts Catalyst and the Department of Genetics at The University of Leicester to create “SpaceBaby” at the event SPACE SOON.

Laurie Anderson is an experimental performance artist and musician who plays violin and keyboards and sings in a variety of experimental music and art rock styles. Initially trained as a sculptor, Anderson did her first performance-art piece in the late 1960’s. Anderson is a pioneer in electronic music and has invented several devices that she has used in her recordings and performance art shows. NASA appointed Laurie Anderson in 2005, as their first official artist-in-residence. NASA probably had in mind a celebratory and hi-tec output – but Anderson, disturbed by NASA’s revived plans to revisit and exploit the moon, created the performance piece The End of the Moon. After the success of Anderson’s show End of the Moon, Anderson paid a special flying visit to London to take part in The Arts Catalyst’s Space Soon event at the Roundhouse on Tuesday 12 September 2006 to reflect on her experiences, show her photographs and videos from her visit to Star City, in conversation with the author and critic Kodwo Eshun. Also in 2005, Anderson visited The Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Centre (Russia’s space programme) and mission control. This project was in collaboration with The Arts Catalyst and saw a very different side of the human spaceflight story, where the post-Soviet cash-strapped Russian space agency sold flights into space to Japanese dotcom billionaires at $20 million a time.

Kodwo Eshun is a writer, theorist, filmmaker and co-founder of The Otolith Group with Anjalika Sagar, 2002. Their practice includes curating, publishing and production of artists work. Their research into aural and visual cultures is informed by the legacy and potential of the moving image and the archive. In 2012 The Otolith Group made the film ‘The Radiant’ exploring the aftermath of the Great Tohoku Earthquake and the partial meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

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Exhibition

POLAR: The Art and Science of Climate Change

A programme focusing on the curation and production of climate change knowledge in the polar regions

POLAR: The Art & Science of Climate Change was a multi-disciplinary project exploring cultural and scientific issues surrounding climate change.

It incorporated a 2-day international symposium, a publication Bipolar, a series of public lectures, and two new artists' commissions from Anne Brodie and Weather Permitting. POLAR was curated by Kathryn Yusoff and The Arts Catalyst, and organised with the British Library and the Open University.

Polar: Fieldwork & Archive Fever - An Interdisciplinary Symposium

Polar: Fieldwork & Archive Fever was an interdisciplinary symposium at the British Library on the 19 & 20 November 2007. It focused on the curation and production of climate change knowledge in the polar regions. Keynote speakers were Professor Denis Cosgrove, University of California, Professor Sverker Sörlin, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, Professor Rachel Weiss, Art Institute of Chicago, and Simon Faithfull, artist.

Full programme and abstracts can be downloaded opposite.

Public Talks

As part of the Polar programme, a series of four public lectures addressed broader cultural and policy-related themes arising from the symposium:

Wed 17 October - Everyday Disasters
Mon 5 November - Climate Change & Human Rights
Mon 19 November - The New Iconography of Climate Change
Mon 26 November - Geopolitics of Cold 

Bipolar Book

Bipolar is a interdisciplinary polar archive created for International Polar Year 2007-08. It is published to mark the 'Polar Archives' symposium and series of talks, held at the British Library in Autumn 2007, which brought together leading artists, scholars, scientists and thinkers to explore how our knowledge of the Polar regions is constructes and how it can be enriched.
The book features essays from the renowned geographer Denis Cosgrove and cultural critic Kathryn Yusoff, and over 30 'archives' contributed by the symposium participants that investigate various records — visual, personal, historical, chemical, biological — that can enrich and extend our engagement with the Polar regions and their effect on global environments. The collection investigates how archives place demands on us to think about what is vital in that knowledge—vital to our present work and to the work to come—the basis on which we remake worlds. With the Polar regions under increasing pressure due to climate change, both environmentally and geopolitically, these archives assume their most potent role as the basis on which we imagine and shape the futures of both polar and global spaces.
Authors include Denis Cosgrove, Kathryn Yusoff, Nicola Triscott, Eric Wolff, Heather Frazar, Rachel Weiss, London Fieldworks, Stephan Harrison, Marko Peljhan, Katrina Dean, Anne Brodie, Sverker Sörlin, Simon Faithfull, Aqqaluk Lynge.
Price £12.95
ISBN 9780953454662
Edited by Kathryn Yusoff
Published by The Arts Catalyst, 2008
Designed by PKMB/Paul Khera
Full colour, 128 pages, softback.
Dimensions 220 x 170mm.
Buy online from Cornerhouse
 

BIPOLAR: ANNE BRODIE, WEATHER PERMITTING

Anne Brodie, Weather Permitting, Jennifer Gabrys, Kathryn Yusoff
Fri 20 June 2008
Society of Antiquaries, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BE
New works by Anne Brodie and Weather Permitting shown at the Society of Antiquaries, London, alongside the launch of a new book, Bipolar.
Two new commissioned works were shown at the Society of Antiquaries to coincide with the launch of the new book Bipolar, as the culmination of the Polar programme.
Artist Anne Brodie took one of the lumps of ice that she had brought back from Antarctica out of its lodgings inside the British Antarctic Surveys freezer in Cambridge and let it not so gently melt over the course of the evening. It was acoustically wired up by sound engineers Lee Patterson and Mark Hornsby, and produced uncomfortably loud interruptions as the ancient air kept locked under pressure by the ice belched into the London air. The cabinet was recycled from an exhibition held in the British museum.
Weather Permitting (Kathryn Yusoff and Jennifer Gabrys) presented a series of large snow globes containing contemporary or near-future polar landscapes. Forecast Factory: Snow Globes and Climate Change are part of a project that investigates the phenomena of weather, from tornadoes in trailer parks to drifting ice shelves in the Antarctic. 
 

Artists

Simon Faithfull’s work often involves elements of failure and anti-heroism. Journeys and travelling are also central to his practice. In a series of experiments conducted over ten years (1995–2005), Faithfull sought to defy gravity with his ‘Escape vehicles’. On September 12 2004, Escape Vehicle No.6 started as a live event commissioned by The Arts Catalyst for its first International Artists Airshow. In December 2004, Faithfull was invited to travel to Antarctica with the British Antarctic Survey as part of The Arts Council’s International Fellowships Programme. This journey culminated in a series of exhibitions in London, New York and Edinburgh, and was published in a text entitled Ice Blink: An Antarctic Essay. In 2007, Faithfull was involved in the symposium, POLAR: The Art & Science of Climate Change. In 2008, Simon Faithfull produced an essay for the Bipolar publication alongside 30 other essays submitted by participants in the Polar programme. Bipolar encourages us to consider how our knowledge of the polar regions is constructed and can be enriched.
 
London Fieldworks aims to enable creative research and collaboration at the art, science and technology interesection. Typically, their projects deal with issues relating to complex relationships existing between social, natural and technological worlds. London Fieldworks was formed by the artists Bruce Gilchrist and Jo Joelson.
 

Support

The project was supported by a grant from Arts Council England, the Open University and in-kind support from the British Library.

 

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Event

Less Remote: The Futures of Space Exploration - An Arts and Humanities Symposium

Less Remote was a two day symposium at the 59th International Astronautical Congress in Glasgow, where artists, thinkers and writers met to discuss the future of space exploration.

The Less Remote symposium aimed to foster a dialogue and exchange between the cultural and space communities. It was organised on the occasion of the 59th International Astronautical Congress in Glasgow, which hosted the symposium. Artists, thinkers and writers contributed to the debates about going back to the Moon and on to Mars, living in space, art in zero gravity, the future of the International Space Station, and the search for life and human origins in scientific missions.

Less Remote featured presentations by Tomas Saraceno, Agnes Meyer Brandis, Marko Peljhan, Zbigniew Oksiuta, Rachel Armstrong, Andy Miah, Sarah Jane Pell, Fraser MacDonald, Nina Czegledy and many others.

Less Remote was organised by Flis Holland and Arts Catalyst, in association with Leonardo and OLATS. The symposum was co-sponsored by the IAA Commission VI

Organisational Committee

Flis Holland, Arts Catalyst, Leonardo, Leonardo/Olats

Peer Review Committee

Flis Holland (Chair), Annick Bureaud (Leonardo / OLATS), Rob La Frenais (Arts Catalyst), Roger Malina (IAA Commission VI), Michael Punt (Leonardo), Sundar Sarukkai (Centre for Philosophy, Indian National Institute of Advanced Studies), Nicola Triscott (Arts Catalyst)

Advisory Committee

Martha Blassnigg, Lowry Burgess, Stephen Dick, Bernard Foing, Roger Malina, Takuro Osaka, Jean-Luc Soret

Support

Arts Council England, IAA Commission VI

Individual speakers and artists at the symposium were sponsored by:
The Goethe Institute, Glasgow, CAP Research Fund, Solent University, The Australian Network for Art & Technology - Professional Development Travel Fund.

Media Coverage

"Glasgow space congress brings it all home : Intergalactic travel is still humanity’s greatest party tricK" - Allan BrownTimes Online review

Sarah Jane Pell review

 

Artists

Tomas Saraceno is an artist and architect from Argentina, with a utopian vision for cities that float in the air, changing form and joining together like clouds. Saraceno is inspired by soap bubbles, spider webs, neural networks, or cloud formations, which are speculative models for alternate ways of living. These structures challenge ideas about nationality and property, intending to reshape notions about social space and human behaviour. Saraceno’s innovative ideas do not rely on the restrictions of our natural landscapes, instead, the series of experimental structures can be inhabited and exploit natural energies.
 
Agnes Meyer-Brandis is an artist based in Berlin, Germany and has been involved in two major Arts Catalyst initiatives. Meyer-Brandis’ artistic practice is influenced by scientific research focused on the exploration of new worlds. Meyer-Brandis is the founder and director of the Research Raft for Subterranean Reefology (FFUR) which has explored deep in the dark zone above the earth and ice. 
 
Rachel Armstrong works with international scientists and architects to explore cutting-edge, sustainable technologies that take the form of new materials that possess some of the properties of living systems. By creating living materials such as, paint that can 'eat' carbon dioxide and change colour when it is 'full' cities will be able to participate in cleaning up the environment and even repairing some of the damage that we've already created. Collaborative work with architect Philip Beesley has been nominated for a Katerva Award in the field of Urban Design. Rachel is Co-Director of AVATAR (Advanced Virtual and Technological Architectural Research) in Architecture & Synthetic Biology at The School of Architecture & Construction at the University of Greenwich, London. Senior TED Fellow, and Visiting Research Assistant at the Centre for Fundamental Living Technology, Department of Physics and Chemistry, University of Southern Denmark.
 
Dr. Sarah Jane Pell is an independent artist, commercial diver, explorer and researcher. She aspires to be amongst the first generation of artists to work in outer space. Her pioneering practice seeks to embody, and critique, the culture of exploration and redefine our visions of future worlds from sea, to summit, to space. She performs expressively and builds novel prototype apparatus to test and communicate from the field. Artifacts include sculptural, technical, poetic and media events. Her work promotes physical conditioning, creative visualisation and communication. Dr. Pell is the first artist to graduate from the International Space University and Singularity University, she was awarded Best PhD Art & Science by Leonardo AS, MIT 2007. She is an experienced occupational diver, aquatic performer and art-science collaborator. She is currently Co-Chair of the European Space Agency (ESA) Topical Team Arts & Science, Senior Space Art Consultant to Icarus Interstellar, RMIT Visiting Fellow and TED Fellow. She is working on Bending Horizons 2015-2017: documenting her own expression during extreme art adventures in space analogue environments undersea, at altitude and in microgravity. She aims to contribute new knowledge on human behaviours, biosensory media and communication design for extreme performance.
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Experience
Event

Planetary Breakdown: autonomous infrastructures for a sustainable future

An event investigating artistic strategies for sustainablity and survivability following impending climate change. A collaboration between Arts Catalyst, Intersections, AV Festival and Baltic.

"Following Helen and Newton Harrison’s notion of the ‘Force Majeure – that we should be preparing for different forms of governance following radical blows to the existing infrastructures by inevitable climate change – Autonomous Infrastructures looks at the many models created by artists and by communities of people operating semi-autonomously in society in intentional and utopian communities. The event examines the symbolic nature of many of these initiatives and proposse the future realisation of unrealised artists infrastructures." - Rob La Frenais

Produced by Intersections (Newcastle University), Arts Catalyst and AV Festival 10.

Programme
Day 1 Tuesday 9 March 2010
Autonomous Infrastructures: sandpit (invited)

The first day was a invited group of around 30 people, mainly artists. We looked at different approaches artists are taking to the question of change and sustainability and, working as small teams, hothouse some potential strategies. 

Day 2 Wednesday 10 March 2010
Symposium: Planetary Breakdown: autonomous infrastructures for a sustainable future

Day 2 was a public symposium with three panels looking at alternative approaches to: communities, trade and energy. The symposium brought together an exceptional range of artists, academics and other industry experts to look at future approaches to living. It explored the possibility of creating new autonomous infrastructures across energy, trade and transport, offering a space for everyone to contribute to an active dialogue about our futures. Speakers: Alternative Communities: Malcolm Miles, Lise Autogena, Nicola Triscott, chair David Butler. Trade: Kate Rich, Ashok Sukumaran, chair Sally Jane Norman. Energy: HeHe, London Fieldworks, Bryony Worthington, chair Rob La Frenais

Reviews of Planetary Breakdown symposium

Artists

London Fieldworks was formed by the artists Bruce Gilchrist and Jo Joelson. London Fieldworks aims to enable creative research and collaboration at the art, science and technology interesection. Typically, their projects deal with issues relating to complex relationships existing between social, natural and technological worlds.
 
Ashok Sukumaran (b.1974) came to international prominence with the extraordinary work Glow Positioning System, 2005. In 2008, he co-founded CAMP, a space for critical artistic research, imagination, and archiving projects. He was awarded the first prize of the 2005 UNESCO Digital Arts Award, and received a Golden Nica at the Prix Ars Electronica, 2007.
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Nuclear Forum

Accompanying the Nuclear: Art & Radioactivity exhibition, the Nuclear Forum was organised by Arts Catalyst and SCAN in partnership with RSA Arts & Ecology.

The forum explored the impact of nuclear power in art and culture. Prominent artists, writers and experts discuss their work and engagement with the issues around nuclear energy, from Hiroshima through the 50s' white heat of technology and the Cold War nuclear tensions to present day energy debates.
 

Speakers:

James Acord, artist and 'nuclear sculptor'
Keith Barnham (Imperial College)
Paul Dorfman (Warwick University), expert on nuclear consultation and radioactivity risks,
Kate Hudson (LSBU), chair of CND and editor of the journal Contemporary Politics
Kyp Kyprianou & Simon Hollington, artists
Steve Kurtz, artist and activist, Critical Art Ensemble (by video link)
Gustav Metzger, artist and activist, founder of Auto-Destructive Art
Chris Oakley, artist
Pam Skelton, artist (Central St Martins College of Art)
John Wills (Kent University), historian, author of Conservation Fallout, a look at nuclear protest in California

Artists

James Acord was the only private individual in the world licensed to own and handle radioactive materials. He is likely to remain so since the authorities closed the loopholes after he achieved his license. His work was a story of a 20-year performance, a cat and mouse game with the nuclear regulatory authorities, in which he pursued his dream of converting highly radioactive waste into inert metal for use in art. Along the way, he created sculpture and events that probed the history of nuclear engineering, often incorporating radioactive materials. His astonishing story shines light on the secrecy and security with which society cloaks the nuclear industry.
 
Chris Oakley is a video and digital imaging artist fascinated with our perception of the world, and how this is continuously altered by the world around us. The artist is concerned with our experience of mainstream media, mass communications and augmented reality. In 2008, Chris Oakley created a film called “Half-life” which explored the histories of Harwell (birthplace of the UK nuclear industry) and the new development of fusion energy technology at the Culham facility in Oxfordshire. The film examined nuclear science research through a historical and cultural filter. With the recent widespread acceptance of the reality of climate change driven by carbon dioxide emissions, this work challenges our understanding of issues surrounding nuclear science. “Half-life” was then screened at The Arts Catalyst's “Nuclear: Art & Radioactivity” exhibition and featured in the accompanying symposium.
 
Gustav Metzger is an artist, activist and founder of the concept 'Auto-Destructive Art', where destruction was part of the process of creating the work. Born in the 1926, he arrived in Britain as a refugee following Nazi persecution. In 1959 Metzger wrote a manifesto 'Auto-destructive Art’. He describes his Auto-destructive art 'as a desperate last-minute subversive political weapon...an attack on the capitalist system...(an attack also on art dealers and collectors who manipulate modern art for profit.' Metzger’s public, performative, temporary and critical approach to art has had a huge impact through the decades – especially influential during the 60s and 70s. His work has been, and continues to be exhibited extensively around the world.
 
Critical Art Ensemble (CAE) is a collective of five tactical media practitioners of various specialisations including computer graphics and web design, film/video, photography, text art, book art and performance. Formed in 1987, CAE's focus has been on the exploration of the intersections between art, critical theory, technology and political activism. The group has exhibited and performed at diverse venues internationally, ranging from the street, to the museum, to the internet. Museum exhibitions include the Whitney Museum and the New Museum in NYC, Corcoran Museum in Washington D.C., ICA in London, MCA in Chicago, Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt and the Natural History Museum in London.
 
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Art + Science Now - Science Fair

The Arts Catalyst teams up with super/collider for their monthly laidback pop science evening

The Arts Catalyst teams up with super/collider for their monthly pop science evening to welcome Professor Stephen Wilson from San Francisco State University, author of Art+Science Now, along with artist Gina Czarnecki.

Stephen Wilson will talk about Art & Resarch:  Who said that scientific research and technological innovations belong only to the technicians?  Research has become a white hot center of cultural foment.  It is affecting everything from the gizmos of everyday life to basic philosophical notions about the nature of reality and what it is to be human. He will explore the idea that the arts can assume their historical role at the edge of culture by becoming the independent zone of research, undertaking investigations ignored or discredited by commercial interests and academic science.  And will present examples from his own artworks in areas such as gps, body sensing, telepresence, and ai and from other artists around the world.  It also explores areas of emerging technolgy and scientific inquiry that call out for artist attention.  The presentation is based on material from his new book Art+Science Now and his MIT Press book, Information Arts: Intersections of Art, Science, and Technology.

Artist Gina Czarnecki will be talking about Wasted a body of inter-related artworks exploring the life-giving potential of ‘discarded’ body parts and their relationship to myths, history, cutting edge stem cell research and notions of what constitutes informed consent.

This is the latest in the series of Science Fair events presented by super/collider – bringing together scientists and stylists, chemists and creative-types, artists and astronomers. with discussions, DIY experiments and a chance to ask why it's just like being back in science class. except with a bar and music and more awesome.

Art + Science Now

A new publication by Stephen Wilson which presents a global overview of the ways in which contemporary artists draw on scientific and technological developments to explore new forms of creative expression.

In the twenty-first century, some of the most dynamic works of art are being produced not in the studio but in the laboratory, where artists probe cultural, philosophical, and social questions connected with cutting-edge scientific and technological research. Their work ranges across disciplines—microbiology, the physical sciences, information technologies, human biology and living systems, kinetics and robotics—and takes in everything from eugenics to climate change to artificial intelligence.

This comprehensive overview covers a dazzling array of work produced by some 250 artists from America, Japan, Germany, France, the Netherlands, the UK, and elsewhere. It presents a broad range of projects, from body art to bioengineering of plants and insects; from music, dance, and computer-controlled video performances to large scale visual and sound installations.

Stephen Wilson is Professor of Conceptual and Information Arts at San Francisco State University and coeditor of Leonardo, the international journal of art and science. He is the author of Information Arts and Using Computers to Create Art.

ISBN 978-0-500-23868-4 · 91/4" x 11" · 270+ color illustrations · 208 pages

Artists

Gina Czarnecki is a British new media artist born in Immingham in 1965. She studied painting and film-making at Wimbledon School of Art 1984-87 and a Postgraduate Degree in Electronic Art at Duncan of Jordanstone College Dundee from 1991-2. Her work spans a variety of mediums, including film, video, sculpture and installation art. Through a varied and often unconventional practice her work engages us with the visceral, psychological and biological grey areas, hybrids and developments that provoke questions on so many levels. Her research focuses on technologies and culture.
 

Websites

Stephen Wilson

Gina Czarnecki

super/collider

The Book Club

 

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Republic of the Moon, Liverpool

A touring exhibition of artists' works that reimagine the future of the Moon. Combining lunar narratives, fantasies and futures, Republic  of the Moon reclaims the Moon for artists, idealists, and dreamers.

As the players in the new 21st century race for the Moon line up – the USA rejoining China, India and Russia and jostling with private corporations interested in exploiting the Moon’s resources – a group of artists are declaring a Republic of the Moon: a ‘micronation’ for alternative visions of lunar life.

Republic of the Moon challenges utilitarian plans of lunar mines and military bases with artists’ imaginings and interventions. Combining beguiling fantasies, personal encounters, and playful appropriations of space habitats and scientific technologies, Republic of the Moon reclaims the Moon for artists, idealists, and dreamers.

The last race to the Moon was driven by the political impulses of the Cold War, but shaped by extraordinary visions of space created by writers, film-makers, and artists, from Jules Verne, Lucien Rudaux, and Vasily Levshin, to HG Wells, Stanislav Lem and Stanley Kubrick. Can artists’ quixotic visions reconcile our romantic notions of the Moon with its colonised future, and help us to reimagine our relationship with our natural satellite in the new space age?

Curated by Arts Catalyst and FACT, Republic of the Moon includes major new commissions by Agnes Meyer-Brandis and WE COLONISED THE MOON, and works by Leonid Tishkov, Andy Gracie, Liliane Lijn and Sharon Houkema.

The Moon Goose Analogue: Lunar Migration Bird Facility, Agnes Meyer-Brandis’ poetic-scientific investigations weave fact, imagination, storytelling and myth, past, present and future. In this major new work  the artist develops an ongoing narrative based on the book ‘The Man in the Moone’, written by the English bishop Francis Godwin in 1603, in which the protagonist flies to the Moon in a chariot towed by ‘moon geese’. Meyer-Brandis has actualised this concept by raising eleven moon geese from birth in Italy, giving them astronauts’ names*, imprinting them on herself as goose-mother, training them to fly and taking them on expeditions. The artist will build a remote Moon analogue habitat for the geese, which will be operated from a control room within the gallery. (* Neil, Svetlana, Gonzales, Valentina, Friede, Juri, Buzz, Kaguya-Anousheh, Irena, Rakesh, Konstantin-Hermann).

Luring us onto the surface of the Moon, WE COLONISED THE MOON (Sue Corke and Hagen Betzwieser) will create an immersive audience experience, Enter At Own Risk. For this new commission, the artists will create an intimate immersive installation in the form of a laboratory-like room in which a lone astronaut tenderly gardens a group of rocks, spraying them periodically with the smell of the Moon - a scent the artists have had synthesised based on reports from the Apollo crew.  The artists question what is real and what is imagined? the nature of the fake and the authentic object, the art of showmanship and illusion through this experimental performance piece, drawing on the entertainment iconography of early astronaut training.

Leonid Tishkov’s Private Moon, by contrast, brings the Moon down to us. Tishkov tells the story of a man who met the Moon and stayed with her for the rest of his life. In a series of photographs, the artist pairs images of his private moon with verse which describes how the Moon helps us to overcome our loneliness in the universe by uniting us around it. Tishkov and his illuminated moon have travelled the world for almost ten years. He has a dream to fly with her to the Moon.

Transforming the everyday into the mesmerisingly beautiful, Sharon Houkema’s M3, created with characteristic simplicity with an overhead projector and a bucket of water, conjures a moon so tantalisingly close you can almost hold it.

Interweaving artistic metaphor and scientific rigour, Andy Gracie‘s DIY-astrobiology experiment Drosophila Titanus attempts to select and breed an organism – a new strain of fruit fly – that might survive on Titan, a moon of Saturn. The artist recreates the environmental and atmospheric conditions found on Titan using everyday materials such as vodka, smoke alarms and a bicycle pump. The first iteration of the experiment was performed by Gracie with Kuaishen Auson, Janine Fenton and Meredith Walsh, in Laboratory Life co-commissioned by Arts Catalyst and Lighthouse earlier this year.

In Liliane Lijn’s moonmeme, the artist reveals her concept to write on the Moon from the Earth using a laser beam. The word ‘SHE' is projected onto the surface of the moon, the meaning of this word being gradually transformed as the Moon moves through its phases, the work combines territorial appropriation, the technological extension of human consciousness and mythologies. moonmeme is a symbolic union of opposites and an homage to the feminine principal of transformation and renewal.

The artists in Republic of the Moon regard the lunar orb not as a resource to be exploited but as a heavenly body that belongs to us all. Who will be the first colonisers of the Moon? Perhaps it should be the artists.

Occupy the Moon

To coincide with the opening of Republic of the Moon, Arts Catalyst has commissioned Tony White to write a short fiction Occupy the Moon.

Republic of the Moon: Artist's Breakfast

10.00am, Fri 16 December 2011
The Box, FACT, 88 Wood Street, Liverpool L1 4DQ
Breakfast with the artsits and curators of the exhibition Republic of the Moon

Artists Agnes Meyer-Brandis, Leonid Tishkov, Liliane Lijn and Andy Gracie discuss their work with The Arts Catalyst's curator Rob La Frenais and FACT's Mike Stubbs.

Crash - Moonlanding Workshop
WE COLONISED THE MOON, Hagen Betzwieser
Fri 16 December 2011 - Sun 26 February 2012
FACT, 88 Wood Street, Liverpool L1 4DQ, UK

In conjunction with Republic of the Moon Exhibition, at FACT, Liverpool, WE COLONISED THE MOON (Sue Corke and Hagen Betzwieser) held a series of workshops for young people taking inspiration from unplanned disasters in space.

Artists

Agnes Meyer-Brandis is an artist based in Berlin, Germany and has been involved in two major Arts Catalyst initiatives. Meyer-Brandis’ artistic practice is influenced by scientific research focused on the exploration of new worlds. Meyer-Brandis is the founder and director of the Research Raft for Subterranean Reefology (FFUR) which has explored deep in the dark zone above the earth and ice. In March 2011, Meyer-Brandis attended The Arts Catalyst’s Kosmica evening to talk about art, science and weightlessness. At this event, the artist explained details about her project Cloud-Core-Scanner, which involved a microgravity-generating flying manoeuvre carried out with the DLR (German Aerospace Centre). In late 2011, Agnes Meyer-Brandis was commissioned by The Arts Catalyst for a project with the touring exhibition “Republic of the Moon” curated by Rob la Frenais. 
 
Liliane Lijn has worked across media – kinetic sculpture, film, performance and collage – to explore language, mythology and the relationship between light and matter. In 2005, Lijn was ACE NASA, Leonardo Network artist in residence at the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. In 2013, Lijn was one of the six artists short-listed to produce a sculpture for the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square. Public commissions include Solar Beacon, a solar installation in collaboration with astrophysicist, John Vallerga on the two towers of the Golden Gate Bridge and Light Pyramid, a beacon for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, Milton Keynes.
 
'WE COLONISED THE MOON' consists of two artists, Sue Corke and Hagen Betzwieser. The artists combine different talents and interests that converge during collaborative projects. Sue Corke is a visual artist with an interest in the theatre of illustration, whilst Hagen Betzwieser’s art practice explores the gaps and connections between art and science with the aim of creating ‘New New Media’. 'WE COLONISED THE MOON' taps into contemporary unease about the future, whilst also offering an entertaining counterpart. In one project, the artists were able to synthesise the smell of the moon based on reports from the Apollo crew. As it is impossible to smell the moon directly, due to the vacuum in space, the reports are based on the scent inhaled when astronauts returned to their landing modules and the dust of the lunar surface reacted with oxygen and moisture for the first time.
 
Andy Gracie is a digital artist, creating technological systems designed to interact with natural living systems, incorporating ecosystems and biotechnology. At two Arts Catalyst events, Laboratory Life and Republic Of The Moon, Gracie presented his project “Drosophila Titanus”. The project developed an experimental breeding programme for fruit flies. The project aimed to genetically modify the new breed of fruit flies in order for them to survive on Titan, one of Saturn’s moons, which is considered to host an environment rather similar to Earth. In order to carry out this experiment, Gracie recreated the atmospheric conditions found on Titan using everyday materials such as vodka, smoke alarms and a bicycle pump.
 

Supported by

Republic of the Moon is a touring exhibition and programme curated by Arts Catalyst and FACT. It has been made possible with Grants for the Arts support from Arts Council England.

Moon Goose Analogue: Lunar Migration Bird Facility, 2011 links directly to Meyer-Brandis's, Moon Goose Colony, 2011, a project during her residency at Pollinaria, Italy, the site of the remote analogue habitat where the artist has raised and houses the colony of moon geese. Pollinaria, Italy

FACT, AV Festival 2012, Arts Council England

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Project
Exhibition

Alternative Ways of Thinking

Two events organised by The Arts Catalyst and Shape, as part of The Times Cheltenham Science Festival, reflected on recent ideas about the minds of autistic and dyslexia people, and consider whether these ‘impairments’ can or should be thought about in a different way.

Exploring the Autistic Mind

The media frequently feature stories about screening for or even ‘curing’ autism, presenting it as an affliction or disease. But people with autism can become excellent scientists and engineers or excel in art and music. This discussion event considered recent ideas about the minds of autistic people: how they think, learn and experience the world.
Kathy Sykes, Professor of Sciences and Society at the University of Bristol, chaired a discussion on creativity and the autistic mind with Simon Baron-Cohen, Director of the Autism Research Centre, artist and geologist, Jon Adams, who has Asperger’s Syndrome, and Gabriel Hardistry-Miller, a non-verbal man with autism who, with artist Ben Connors, runs a music, performance and poetry club called Pig Pen. Together they will consider whether these so called ‘impairments’ should be thought of in a different way.

3D Thinkers in a 2D World, Benedict Phillips

The ability to think in a 3-dimensional, multi-sensory way is a talent that dyslexic people share, but 2-dimensional symbols and words can cause them problems and confusion. In a humorous and thought-provoking performance, artist Benedict Phillips unleashes his dyslexic side as ‘The DIV’ highlighting and examining our presumptions about intelligence, communication and perception, unravelling the numerous misconceptions surrounding dyslexia and presenting the unusual advantages it brings. ‘Everyone can be Dislecksick; you just need to try harder’.

Partners

Presented by The Arts Catalyst and Shape in partnership with The Times Cheltenham Science Festival

Artists

Jon Adams works in a variety of mediums, is a trained geologist and considers himself to to be an ‘Outsider Artist’. Adams has Asperger Syndrome (an autism spectrum disorder) and experiences synaesthesia, a neurological condition in which stimulation of one sense leads to automatic, involuntary responses in a second sense, for example, ‘seeing sounds’. The artist’s work explores sense and sensitivity through the ‘hidden’ and plays with perceptions of normal and the inaccessible.

Simon Baron-Cohen is Professor of Developmental Psychopathology at University of Cambridge and Director of the Autism Research Centre in Cambridge. He has degrees in Human Sciences from New College, Oxford, a PhD in Psychology from UCL, and an M.Phil in Clinical Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry in London. He is the author of several books including Mindblindness, The Essential Difference, Prenatal Testosterone in Mind and Zero Degrees of Empathy, as well as the BAFTA-nominated DVDs Mind Reading and The Transporters, to help people with autism to learn emotion recognition. Recent awards include the Lifetime Achievement Award from MENSA in 2011 and the Kanner–Asperger Medal in 2013. He is a trustee of a number of autism charities, including the Autism Research Trust.
 

Artists websites

Jon Adams, Benedict Phillips, Pig Pen (Gabriel Hardistry-Miller & Ben Connors)

Funder

Funded by a Wellcome Trust People Award and Arts Council England

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