Less Remote: The Futures of Space Exploration - An Arts and Humanities Symposium

Less Remote was a two day symposium at the 59th International Astronautical Congress in Glasgow, where artists, thinkers and writers met to discuss the future of space exploration.

The Less Remote symposium aimed to foster a dialogue and exchange between the cultural and space communities. It was organised on the occasion of the 59th International Astronautical Congress in Glasgow, which hosted the symposium. Artists, thinkers and writers contributed to the debates about going back to the Moon and on to Mars, living in space, art in zero gravity, the future of the International Space Station, and the search for life and human origins in scientific missions.

Less Remote featured presentations by Tomas Saraceno, Agnes Meyer Brandis, Marko Peljhan, Zbigniew Oksiuta, Rachel Armstrong, Andy Miah, Sarah Jane Pell, Fraser MacDonald, Nina Czegledy and many others.

Less Remote was organised by Flis Holland and Arts Catalyst, in association with Leonardo and OLATS. The symposum was co-sponsored by the IAA Commission VI

Organisational Committee

Flis Holland, Arts Catalyst, Leonardo, Leonardo/Olats

Peer Review Committee

Flis Holland (Chair), Annick Bureaud (Leonardo / OLATS), Rob La Frenais (Arts Catalyst), Roger Malina (IAA Commission VI), Michael Punt (Leonardo), Sundar Sarukkai (Centre for Philosophy, Indian National Institute of Advanced Studies), Nicola Triscott (Arts Catalyst)

Advisory Committee

Martha Blassnigg, Lowry Burgess, Stephen Dick, Bernard Foing, Roger Malina, Takuro Osaka, Jean-Luc Soret

Support

Arts Council England, IAA Commission VI

Individual speakers and artists at the symposium were sponsored by:
The Goethe Institute, Glasgow, CAP Research Fund, Solent University, The Australian Network for Art & Technology - Professional Development Travel Fund.

Media Coverage

"Glasgow space congress brings it all home : Intergalactic travel is still humanity’s greatest party tricK" - Allan BrownTimes Online review

Sarah Jane Pell review