9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering Revisited, 1966/2016

Arts Catalyst presents 9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering Revisited 1966/2016, including a night of new cross-disciplinary performance art and an archival exhibition


9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering Revisited 1966/2016 programme listing:

Arts Catalyst presents Experiments in Art and Technology
Private View: Thu 22 September 6pm – 8.30pm please RSVP*
Thu 22 September – Sat 29 October 2016, Thursdays & Fridays, 12 noon – 6pm
Arts Catalyst Centre, 74-76 Cromer Street, London, WC1H 8DR
An exhibition chronicling the history of Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T.), the group who were behind the 9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering event.

Gallery tour of the Story of E.A.T with Barbro Schultz Lundestam
Sat 24 September 3pm-4pm
Arts Catalyst Centre, 74-76 Cromer Street, London, WC1H 8DR
Joins us for a gallery tour with Swedish journalist and independent documentary director Barbro Schultz Lundestam who was responsible for the re-emergence of documentation of the seminal performances by Experiments in Art and Technology in 1966.

Experiments and Incidents - Julie Martin and Barbra Steveni in conversation
Wed 5 October, 6.45 - 8.30pm
Booking required
Arts Catalyst Centre, 74-76 Cromer Street, London, WC1H 8DR
Julie Martin (Experiments in Art and Technology) and Barbra Steveni (Artist Placement Group / O+I) in conversation, chaired by artist Neal White, Professor of Art/Science, University of Westminster.

Side Effects by Robert Whitman
Fri 7 October 2016, entrance 7pm, performance 7.30pm
Tickets £10 student, £15 standard, via Eventbrite
The Crossing, Granary Square, Kings Cross, London N1C 4AA
Robert Whitman presents a new Arts Catalyst commissioned performance called Side Effects.

Exhibition Histories - Art and Technology Talk: Jeremy Millar
Thu 13 October, 6.30pm
[SOLD OUT]
Arts Catalyst Centre, 74-76 Cromer Street, London, WC1H 8DR

Exhibition Histories - Art and Technology Talk: Catherine Wood
Thu 20 October, 6.30pm
[SOLD OUT]
Arts Catalyst Centre, 74-76 Cromer Street, London, WC1H 8DR

Experiments and Incidents - Julie Martin and Barbara Steveni in Conversation
Thu 27 October, 6.30pm
Tickets via Eventbrite
Arts Catalyst Centre, 74-76 Cromer Street, London, WC1H 8DR
 

Why make it simple, whe you can make it complex?

Sat 29 October 2016, 12-6pm, Free, drop in
Arts Catalyst Centre, 74-76 Cromer Street, London, WC1H 8DR
This day long event has arisen from a month long collaboration between a group of students from MA Art and Science at Central Saint Martins, UAL, and recent graduates from Goldsmiths and Farnham. The group came together as performers in Robert Whitman’s new commission 'Side Effects', produced as part of Arts Catalysts current season ‘9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering Revisited 1966/2016’. In collaboration with The Performance Studio, Arts Catalyst has since hosted weekly workshops for the group to develop a practical and historical perspective on performance practice and transdisciplinary working. The resulting performative installation involves individual works, collectively mediated by the group.
 
Auto Italia discussion with Exhibition Studies Working Group
Thu 3 November 2016, 6.30pm
Arts Catalyst Centre, 74-76 Cromer Street, London, WC1H 8DR


Exactly fifty years after the legendary 9 Evenings: Theater and Engineering, Arts Catalyst revisits this hugely influential art event with a new performance commission by Robert Whitman, participating artist in the original 9 Evenings and co-founder of Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T) who produced it. An accompanying exhibition, talks and events programme will be held at Arts Catalyst Centre for Art, Science & Technology and other venues across the city, developed in collaboration with Afterall and students from Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London and Goldsmiths, University of London.

9 Evenings: Theater and Engineering was initiated by artist Robert Rauschenberg and the engineer Billy Kluver. This 1966 event was a pioneering project in large-scale collaboration between artists and engineers. 9 Evenings was a significant moment in art history when many artists became aware for the first time of the implications that advancements in technology had for the development of their own artwork. Artists, including Robert Rauschenberg, John Cage, Robert Whitman and Yvonne Rainier worked with engineers for 10 months to develop technical equipment and systems that were used as an integral part of the artists’ performances, producing a blend of avant-garde theatre, dance and new technologies. The collaboration produced many ‘firsts’ with specially designed systems and with innovative use of existing equipment.

In October 2016, Arts Catalyst presents a contemporary re-imaging of this seminal event, with a programme throughout the month. Robert Whitman’s performance will be held in The Crossing, an ex-industrial warehouse space in the new Kings Cross development. Whitman will present his new performance, Side Effects, commissioned for this event. This spectacular evening will mix pre-recorded and live-streamed moving image from across the city, animated by a live performance unfolding over eight acts.

Within walking distance, the Arts Catalyst Centre for Art, Science & Technology hosts an exhibition of film footage from the 1966 9 Evenings events, alongside an archival presentation of the broader work of E.A.T., making public this rich history of cross-disciplinary collaboration. In addition talks developed, in collaboration with Afterall’s Exhibition Histories series, will reflect on the histories of art and technology in performance, transdisciplinary collaboration, and the influence of the 1960s on contemporary art today.

Finally, since January 2016 a working group of students from MRes Art: Exhibition Studies at Central Saint Martins and MFA Curating, Goldsmiths University of London, have been using 9 Eveningsand the work of E.A.T as a starting point to reflect on: re-staging and re-enactments as a method of doing art history, transdisciplinary practice and exhibiting the archive. The result of the working group will be three texts, compiled in a booklet that will be distributed both online and at the Arts Catalyst’s October events. A working group made up of students from MA Art and Science at Central Saint Martins, as well as other programmes, will collectively develop their own performances, to be held at Arts Catalyst’s Centre throughout October.

This programme is supported by Arts Council England, Cockayne – Grants for the Arts, The London Community Foundation, PACE, Afterall, Central Saint Martins, UAL, King’s Cross and Goldsmiths, University of London, University of Westminster, London: The Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media (CREAM) with the Institute for Modern and Contemporary Culture (IMCC) and The Performance Studio.

 

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Test Sites: Poole Harbour

Test Sites is Arts Catalyst’s series of inquiries into matters of concern connected with environmental change – such as flooding, pollution, and species loss – and their impact on local and their impact on local culture and the health and well-being of our ecosystems and ourselves. At each site, we invite local people to be part of art-led co-inquiries, working with artists, scientists, and other experts.

Test Sites: Poole Harbour was inspired by the idyllic landscape of this natural harbour with its serene wooded islands and beaches, a site of outstanding natural beauty, which boasts numerous Sites of Scientific Interest, the start of a UNESCO world heritage park, and countless European Union protected environmental habitats, and the contrast with the almost invisible network of oil industry activities and varied commercial and military interests that also characterise the area.During 2017 and 2018, Arts Catalyst has organised field trips, workshops and platforms bringing together artists, scientists, students and wildlife experts, many of whom lived locally to Poole, to explore the ecology and economy of the harbour area and Brownsea Island, and the shifting tensions between private land use and ecological needs, between scientific and amateur understanding of wildlife patterns, and between the competing needs of leisure boat users, tourists, shipping, the military, and the oil industry.

Core team members are artists Neal White and Anna Troisi, marine biologist Rick Stafford from Bournemouth University, and Anna Santomauro, Nicola Triscott and Claudia Lastra from Arts Catalyst. Other contributors include the Alternative School of Economics.

More information about future workshops, events and opportunities will be announced here and through our mailing list.

The project will gather pace during 2019 with workshops, residencies, situated knowledge and citizen science research leading to the creation of site-specific artworks, events, and alternative archives of knowledge.

Supported by EMERGE, Bournemouth University and the University of Westminster, in collaboration with Dorset Wildlife Trust, Lighthouse Poole and the Arts Development Company.

Image: Design by An Endless Supply

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Test Sites: Calder Valley

Test Sites is Arts Catalyst’s series of inquiries into matters of concern connected with environmental change – such as flooding, pollution, and species loss – and their impact on local culture and the health and wellbeing of our ecosystems and ourselves. At each site, we are involving local people in art-led co-inquiries, working with artists, scientists, and other experts.

In the Calder Valley in Yorkshire, where flooding and water pollution have been issues for 200 years, we are exploring water governance in relation to health, wellbeing and the resilience of communities and ecologies, in partnership with many local individuals and groups. The core team comprises artist Ruth Levene, anthropologist Megan Clinch, artist group Invisible Flock, curator Anna Santomauro from Arts Catalyst, with input from Liz Sharp at Pennine Water Group, University of Sheffield, and the water@leeds group, University of Leeds.

We began in 2017 by making two research journeys by narrowboat along the Calder/ Hebble Navigation meeting local people, river/canal users, and experts with interests in water, the history of the river and canal, and water governance.

During 2018, under the banner of ‘The River College’, we organised workshops with local groups and hosted stands and events at local festivals, using walks, games, geological cake-baking, water testing experiments and exhibits of maps and models to spark conversations around the geology, ecology, history, pollution and uses of the water system, while exchanging ideas around water’s social, spiritual, political and environmental meanings. Alongside, we held many group meetings and interviews to gather people’s varied understandings about the Calder water system and its management.

In Summer 2019, we will unfold a series of art installations and public events at festivals and venues along the Calder Valley, sharing our findings and continuing the inquiry with many more people. Find out more about the Summer programme here!

CO-INQUIRERS

Ruth Levene
Ruth Levene is an artist based in Sheffield, Yorkshire working in video, performance, events, digital drawings, walks, installations and participatory work. Curious and concerned by the complex systems we live by, she is currently exploring water systems, farming and market driven developments of the countryside.

Megan Clinch
Dr Megan Clinch is an anthropologist and lecturer at Queen Mary, University of London. Her research explores how different forms of investigation, experimentality, evidence, and evaluation are understood (or not) and managed in the development of public health interventions.

Invisible Flock
Invisible Flock is an interactive arts studio based in the UK, making innovative artworks to be experienced and participated in by thousands all over the world. The artists create highly sensory installations and environments that ask us to re-negotiate our emotional relationship to the natural world.

Anna Santomauro
Anna Santomauro is a curator, educator and researcher in micropolitics and socially engaged art. She is Programme Curator at Art Catalyst.

Test Sites: Calder Valley is supported by the Wellcome Trust, Canal and River Trust and Arts Council England.

Hero image: Design by An Endless Supply

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Material Sight: Research

Arts Catalyst hosts this artist-led research project by Fiona Crisp, who is using non-documentary photography and film to embody a sense of material encounter at three world-leading research facilities for fundamental science.

Many areas of contemporary science, including cosmology, particle physics and astrophysics, operate at scales and levels of complexity that lie beyond the imaginative and cognitive grasp of most people. Historically, Western culture measured space and time through the body, but over the centuries science and technology have pursued knowledge beyond the edges of bodily perception, from the macro extremes of the multiverse to the micro-scale of the sub-atomic world. Today, with advanced science and technology, and with the accelerating impact of human activity on the planet, we live in new scales of size and speed that we cannot easily comprehend. If so much knowledge comes through scientific instruments, how can we make sense of it within our own experience? As the astronomer Roger Malina notes: “Our intuition, our languages, our metaphors and our arts are all built on the wrong data for understanding the universe”.

Crisp approaches this dilemma through the use of still and moving imagery to place us in a bodily relation to the physical spaces and laboratories where fundamental science is performed. The artist's research is taking her to the Laboratori Nazionale del Gran Sasso, sited within a mountain in central Italy, the world’s largest underground research centre for particle physics; Boulby Underground Laboratory, which occupies the UK’s deepest working mine, over a kilometre beneath the Earth’s surface; and the combined facilities at Durham University, UK, that include the Centre for Advanced Instrumentation and the Institute of Computational Cosmology. She is interested in whether photography can embody the spaces of experimental science and present them back to scientists and non-scientists alike as sites of phenomenological encounter.

Arts Catalyst is hosting Crisp’s research process in the context of a broader consideration of the philosophical, cultural and practical issues of science coming to us through mediated data, and the challenge (to use Malina’s phrase) of “making science intimate”. Through an associated symposium with the Institute of Physics and other activities, we will explore the insights and strategies of artists and cultural practitioners whose creative work can help to transform and inform our intuitions and vocabulary about science.

Funded by The Leverhulme Trust under their Research Fellowship scheme.

Keep up to date with Fiona Crisp's ongoing project research by following the Material Sight website.

 

Resources

Negative Capability: Imaging and Imagining Fundamental Science Through Productive Doubt
This article was published in the journal GeoHumanities in 2015 and outlines some of the formative thinking behind Material Sight.

 

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Nuclear Culture Project 2016/17

A curatorial research project led by Ele Carpenter, associate curator at Arts Catalyst, in partnership with Goldsmiths College.


The Nuclear Culture Project is a curatorial exploration of nuclear culture, which began with considering the conceptual and cultural challenges of dismantling nuclear submarines in the UK, inviting artists to consider the aesthetic, conceptual, ethical and cultural concerns of nuclear submarines in conjunction with experts in the field. The project is bringing together scientists, engineers and community activists with artists and ethicists to develop new opportunities for creative practice investigating nuclear culture. Specific areas of enquiry include: the invisibility of the nuclear economy, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant meltdown, geological waste storage, the Anthropocene, and nuclear humanities.

The project involves artists’ field trips, commissioning new work and curating exhibitions, film screenings and interdisciplinary symposia, and public events and talks. Three groups of artists are developing new work in response to the culture of submarines, decay rates, and the architectures of decision-making: Jon Thomson & Alison Craighead; Nick Crowe & Ian Rawlinson; Lise Autogena, Susan Schuppli and David Mabb.


The Nuclear Culture website has more information about Ele Carpenter's research.
 

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Nuclear Culture Project

A curatorial research project led by Ele Carpenter, associate curator at Arts Catalyst, in partnership with Goldsmiths College, University of London

The Nuclear Culture Project is a curatorial exploration of nuclear culture, which began with considering the conceptual and cultural challenges of dismantling nuclear submarines in the UK, inviting artists to consider the aesthetic, conceptual, ethical and cultural concerns of nuclear submarines in conjunction with experts in the field. The project is bringing together scientists, engineers and community activists with artists and ethicists to develop new opportunities for creative practice investigating nuclear culture. Specific areas of enquiry include: the invisibility of the nuclear economy, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant meltdown, geological waste storage, the Anthropocene, and nuclear humanities.

Activities

The project involves artists’ field trips, commissioning new work and curating exhibitions, film screenings and interdisciplinary symposia, and public events and talks. Three groups of artists are developing new work in response to the culture of submarines, decay rates, and the architectures of decision-making: Jon Thomson & Alison Craighead; Nick Crowe & Ian Rawlinson; and Lise Autogena.

Key areas of the research are discussed in a report on the Nuclear Culture Symposium co-authored by Ele Carpenter & Jantine Schroeder, Antwerp Uni. 2013, available here

Nuclear Culture website

The Nuclear Culture website publishes research articles, reviews, interviews and information about creative research, field trips and art practice.

Public Exhibitions & Events

Actinium, exhibition & forum, S-AIR, OYOYO Sapporo, Japan, July 2014. Supported by the Daiwa Foundation
Panning for Atomic Gold, symposium, Arts Catalyst, 17 May 2014
Nuclear Culture, workshop and film screenings, Arts Catalyst, April 2013

Artists Field Trips

  • Tomari Nuclear Power Plant & Horonobe Underground Research Lab, Hokkaido, Japan, 2014
  • S-AIR Sapporo, Aichi Triennale, Japan, Ele Carpenter, 2013
  • LLW Ltd, Cumbria, UK, Jon Thomson, Alison Craighead, Ele Carpenter, 2013
  • Cove Park Residency, Rosneath Peninsula, Scotland, Ele Carpenter, 2013
  • HMS Courageous, Devonport Plymouth, UK. Nick Crowe, Ian Rawlinson, Susan Schuppli, Lucia Garavaglia, Ele Carpenter, 2013
  • MoDeRN Conference, EU Commission, Luxembourg, Nick Crowe, Ele Carpenter, 2013
  • Aldermaston Womens’ Peace Camp, UK, Lise Autogena, Ele Carpenter, 2012

Nuclear Culture Research Group

The Nuclear Culture Research Group is a an interdisciplinary group of artists, curators and scholars in the nuclear arts and humanities convened by Goldsmiths College, University of London, in partnership with Arts Catalyst.

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Wrecked on the Intertidal Zone

Wrecked on the Intertidal Zone, a series of investigations into the Thames Estuary


Follow the progress of the project on the Wrecked website.


The Thames estuary is a complex collection of objects, atmospheres and flows that cannot readily be reduced to scientific methods and models. The estuary is changing rapidly with new industrial infrastructure in construction, including the largest container port in the UK. The estuary's sea marshes, tidal flats and muddy waters are critical wilderness zones for biodiversity conservation and species migration. Simultaneously, they are also zones for leisure and tourism, fishing grounds and the sites of historic wrecks.

This exploratory project, led by YoHa and Arts Catalyst, brings together a network of local people with artists and technologists to explore how local "situated" knowledge of the estuary can be combined with artistic investigations and citizen science techniques to explore and respond to a changing contested estuary.

Through a series of participatory workshops, public realm art projects and activities, which began in Summer 2014 and will continue at least to Summer 2016, Wrecked on the Intertidal Zone will profile ways of structuring information from situated knowledge (bird watchers, fishermen, mud walkers, amateur ecologists) and verifiable methods (monitoring networks and ambient sensors).

By fostering an ecology of practices, Wrecked on the Intertidal Zone aims to generate a critical interest in the complex influences governing these delicate environments.

Participating artists include YoHa, Fran Gallardo, Critical Art Ensemble and Andy Freeman.

 

 

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KiiCS: Knowledge Incubation in Innovation and Creation for Science

The Arts Catalyst is a partner in KiiCS (Knowledge Incubation in Innovation and Creation for Science), a 3-year European Commission Seventh Framework funded project (February 2012 – January 2015) which aims to:

  • Develop and explore original and innovative processes, methods and tools to "incubate” interdisciplinary arts, science and technology projects. Artists and scientists are brought together to produce and work on new, innovative ideas thus providing evidence of the positive impact of art and science interaction on creativity and innovation.
  • Encourage young people to engage in scientific activities and raise their interest in science and technology. Young adults (14-17 years old) are invited to discover new ways to look at science with the support of creative and artistic interventions.
  • Explore business partnership and market potential for the most innovative ideas stemming from art and science interaction. 

The Arts Catalyst was one of seven city nodes across Europe. Our activities included workshops with scientists and artists and other 'incubation' activities in The Arts Catalyst's London Project Space (between February 2012 and July 2013), including MadLab's 'Lab Easy' residency and workshop series, a one-day workshop with scientists including Dr Ceri Brenner, artists including Torsten Lauschmann, Lindsay Seers and Adam Chodzco, and designer Anab Jain, artist Alistair McClymont's residency at the Central Laser Facility, and artists' research and development projects by Torsten Lauschmann, Revital Cohen and Tuur Van Balen, and Andy Freeman.

 

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ITACCUS

International committee on the cultural utilisation of space

The new IAF (International Astronautical Federation) Technical Activities Committee for the Cultural Utilisation of Space (ITACCUS) has been set up to promote and facilitate the innovative utilisation of space by cultural sectors of society internationally. The term 'utilisation' is used often by the space community. In a cultural context, it may include cultural production, cultural preservation, cultural representation, cultural education and cultural development.

The Arts Catalyst is a founder member of ITACCUS. The current Co-Chairs are Roger Malina, IAA and Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille, and Nicola Triscott, Director, The Arts Catalyst. Membership comprises individuals acting as liaisons for many cultural and space organisations (committee membership listed below).

In June 2008, in her capacity as ITACCUS Co-chair, Nicola Triscott was invited to make a presentation to the United Nations Committee on the Cultural Utilisation of Space (COPUOS) in Vienna. 

ITACCUS Activities

ITACCUS' activities comprise:

* Advocacy - promoting, developing and raising the profile and quality of ‘cultural utilisation of space’ within the space community and within the cultural community internationally, and with the general public

* Collaboration – organising meetings and workshops internationally.

* Communication & Dialogue – There is an ITACCUS Google Group with open membership

* Knowledge Hub

* Promoting Quality Cultural Products

ITACCUS Pilot Projects

    ITACCUS endorsed, and was launched to the public at, the Less Remote symposium at the 59th International Astronautical Congress in Glasgow in 2008.

    ITACCUS is endorsing a major European touring exhibition 'Republic of the Moon' which will open at FACT, Liverpool, UK, in April 2010. The curators of the exhibition include Rob La Frenais, The Arts Catalyst, and Mike Stubbs, FACT.

    ITACCUS will collaborate with the International Lunar Exploration working group to develop the cultural aspects of this work.

    ITACCUS is sponsoring a session on 'Water from Space: Societal, Educational and Cultural Aspects' at the 61st International Astronautical Congress in Prague in 2010. This will be a joint session between the IAF Space Education and Outreach Commitee and the IAA Commission VI.

    Committee Membership

    Co-Chair, Space Sector:

    • Roger Malina, IAA and Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille 
    • Co-Chair, Cultural Sector:
    • Nicola Triscott, Director, The Arts Catalyst, London 

    Cultural Sector

    • FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology), Liverpool, UK: Mike Stubbs, Director, FACT 
    • Leonardo/OLATS, France: Annick Bureaud 
    • Srishti School of Art, Design and Technology, Bangalore, India: Geetha Narajanan, President
    • National Institute for Advanced Study, Bangalore, India: Sundar Sarukkai, Dean of Humanities
    • Space Art One, Paris, France: Jean Luc Soret, President 
    • Zero Gravity Arts Consortium, USA  (ZGAC): Frank Pietronigro 
    • The Arts Catalyst, London: Rob La Frenais, Curator 
    • UNESCO, Paris: Mario Hernandez 
    • Transmediale, Berlin: Steve Kovaz, Director 
    • ECAV, Switzerland: Georges Pfruender 
    • Les Abbatoirs, Toulouse: Pascal Pique, Curator 
    • V2_Organisation for the Unstable Media, Rotterdam: Alex Adrianssens, Director 

    Space Sector

    Space Agencies:

    • ESA: Miquel Pastor Vinader 
    • NASA (HQ): Steven J Dick  
    • NASA JPL: Dan Goods 
    • NASA JSC: Wendell Mendell 
    • JAXA: Matsuo Naoko 
    • Brazil: Aristides Pavani 

    Industries:

    • Athena Global, Canada: Karl Doetsch, President  
    • Deimos Space S.A.: Pedro Duque, Director General 
    • Lockheed (Palo Alto Research Labs): Frank Friedlaender 
    • Space Technology Ireland Ltd , Ireland: Susan McKenna Lawlor, President  

    Space NGOs:

    • Boston University, Center for Space Physics: Dr Supriya Chakrabarti 
    • International Academy of Astronautics: David Raitt, Commission VI Chair Ex Officio
    • International Federation of Astronautics, Education and Outreach Committee: Chris Welch 
    • International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG): Bernard Foing 
    • Hubble Space Telescope Institute: Carol Christian
    • Space Generation Advisory Council: Kevin Stube. Executive Secretary, Agnieszka Lukaszczyk  
    • Space School Africa, South Africa: Adrian Meyer, Chief Executive Officer 
    • Spaceland, Italy: Carlo Viberti, President 
    • U.N. Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS): Ambassador Ciro Arevalo Yepes, Chairman of COPUOS
    • Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge: Barry Phipps

    Some Examples of Cultural Utilisation of Space

    A number of space agencies (JAXA, ESA, CNES, NASA for instance) have developed programmes that promote cultural uses (eg artist residencies, flights by artists on parabolic zero gravity training planes).

    UNESCO has an ambitious programme to use remote sensing from satellites to help document and protect cultural sites designed by UNESCO as World Heritage Sites.

    In 2005 the European Space Agency awarded a contract to The Arts Catalyst to develop recommendations for how ESA could develop a new category of users of the International Space Station (ISS) from the cultural sector (such as artists and performance companies).

    For the past 5 years JAXA has worked with art and architecture schools in Japan to develop ideas for culturally specific activities on the ISS.

    Cultural organisations The Arts Catalyst, Projekt Atol and ZGAC have organised parabolic flights specifically for cultural programmes. Commercial parabolic flight companies now routinely include artists. As mentioned above, ESA, CNES and the Russian Space Agency have accommodated artists on zero gravity flights on their training planes.

    A number of art museums have organised exhibitions of "space art" and space related art.

    A number of space science laboratories and observatories have hosted artists' projects and residencies, such as the NASA/Arts Council England residencies at Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory.

    Many artists have used space data in the creation of artworks, such as using radioastronomy data to make sound art.

    Google Earth and Google Sky make available satellite remote sensing and astronomical data for all applications and uses both commercial and cultural.

     

     

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    Arctic Perspective Initiative

    Arctic Perspective highlighted the cultural, geopolitical and ecological significance of the Arctic and its indigenous cultures. In collaboration with the people of Igloolik and other communities in Nunavut, Canada, artists and architects are devising a mobile media and living unit and infrastructure, powered by renewable energy sources, which can be used for nomadic dwelling environmental monitoring and media based work 'on the land', away from the established Arctic settlements.

    API was initiated artists Marko Peljhan and Matthew Biederman.

    The API project website gives details of the process of the project, including the team's visits to Igloolik, Foxe Basin and other Inuit communities in Nunavut, Arctic Canada, the international open architecture competition to design the media unit, and the construction of the prototype unit.

    Publications


    Cahier No. 1: Arctic Architecture (ISBN 978-3-7757-2679-5) is now available - order online here
    Cahier No. 2: Arctic Geopolitics & Autonomy (ISBN 978-3-7757-2681-8) - order online here
     

    Exhibitions

    Arctic Perspective, London
    21 May - 30 September 2010
    Canada House, Trafalgar Square, London, UK
    The Arctic Perspective exhibition at Canada House showed film and photographic documentation of the API project, including specially commissioned architectural models of the winning entries from an international open design competition for the mobile unit, which received more than 100 entries from over 30 countries. The winning unit architectural designs are by Richard Carbonnier (Canada), Catherine Rannou (France) and Giuseppe Mecca (Italy). Presented in conjunction with the London Festival of Architecture.

    Arctic Perspective, Dortmund
    18 June - 10 October 2010
    HMKV Phoenix Halle, Dortmund, Germany
    A large-scale exhibition of Arctic Perspective, organsed by HMKV, was held in Dortmund in the framework of European Capital of Culture RUHR 2010 and the international media-art conference ISEA 2010. The exhibition focused on the notions of architecure, geopolitics, autonomy, technology and landscape. As well as documentation from the API project, the exhibition also featured other positive nothern initiatives that reflect the values of API.

    Contemporary Nomadism: Autonomy & Technology in the North (Discussion event)
    20 May 2010, Canada House, London
    Artists, academics and architects explored the API's cultural, historical and political contexts. Panel: Marko Peljhan, artist and instigator of Arctic Perspective Initiative, director Projekt Atol (Slovenia), David Turnbull, science sociologist (Australia), Richard Carbonnier, architect (Canada), Inke Arns, curator, artistic director HMKV (Germany). Chair: Michael Bravo, Scott Polar Research Institute (UK/Canada)

    Arctic Perspective Open Space Conference
    24-26 September 2010, PHOENIX Halle, Dortmund, Germany
    The API open space conference gathered some of the most dynamic thinkers from and on the circumpolar regions and the open source technology and tactical media communities in an intense three-day situation involving critical debate and reflection.

    Support

    API is supported by the European Commission Culture 2007 Programme, City of Dortmund, Federal Centre for Civic Education, Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Slovenia, City of Ljubljana and Arts Council England.

    Partners include the Arctic Perspective Initiative, HMKV in Germany, Projekt Atol in Slovenia, C-TASC in Canada, Lorna in Iceland and Arts Catalyst in the UK.

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